'In case you didn't hear me the first time': An examination of repetitious upward dissent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores how employees express dissent to management about the same issue on multiple occasions across time (i.e., how they practice repetition). Employees completed a survey instrument reporting how often they used varying upward dissent tactics, how often and for how long they raised the same issue, and how they perceived their supervisors responded to their concerns. Results indicate that employees relied predominantly on competent upward dissent tactics but that they adopted less competent and more face-threatening tactics as repetition progressed. In addition, employees' perceptions of their supervisors' responses to repetition related to the overall duration of repetition but not to the frequency with which employees raised issues or the amount of time that elapsed between dissent episodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-436
Number of pages21
JournalManagement Communication Quarterly
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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employee
Personnel
examination
tactics
Supervisory personnel
Employees
Dissent
Tactics
management
Supervisors
time

Keywords

  • Employee dissent
  • Employee voice
  • Upward communication
  • Upward dissent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Communication

Cite this

'In case you didn't hear me the first time' : An examination of repetitious upward dissent. / Kassing, Jeffrey.

In: Management Communication Quarterly, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2009, p. 416-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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