Improving the writing, knowledge, and motivation of struggling young writers: Effects of self-regulated strategy development with and without peer support

Karen R. Harris, Steve Graham, Linda H. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

215 Scopus citations

Abstract

Writing development involves changes that occur in children's strategic behavior, knowledge, and motivation. The authors examined the effectiveness of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD), a strategy instructional model designed to promote development in each of these areas. Instruction focused on planning and writing stories and persuasive essays. The addition of a peer support component to SRSD instruction aimed at facilitating maintenance and generalization effects was also examined. SRSD had a positive impact on the writing performance and knowledge of struggling second-grade writers attending urban schools serving a high percentage of low-income families. In comparison with children in the Writers' Workshop condition, SRSD-instructed students were more knowledgeable about writing and evidenced stronger performance in the two instructed genres (story and persuasive writing) as well as two uninstructed genres (personal narrative and informative writing). More-over, the peer support component augmented SRSD instruction by enhancing specific aspects of students' performance in both the instructed and uninstructed genres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-340
Number of pages46
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Peer assistance
  • Self-regulated strategy development
  • Strategy instruction
  • Struggling learners
  • Writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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