Improving the process efficiency of catheterization laboratories using simulation

Srimathy Mohan, Qing Li, Mohan Gopalakrishnan, John Fowler, Antonios Printezis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As the size of the population suffering from cardiac problems increases, the number of catheterization procedures performed is growing rapidly. The high costs associated with catheterization laboratories (cath labs) make managing these resources a critical task that impacts the efficiency and operating costs of hospitals as well as the quality of care. This study describes a discrete event simulation model developed to analyze the various factors that affect utilization of cath labs at a 337-bed full-service hospital in Scottsdale Arizona and provide decision support for improving the efficiency of the cath lab operations. The simulation model helped evaluate the performance of the existing approach at the hospital and compare alternative policies to improve operational efficiency. We consider both operational and patient satisfaction metrics and illustrate the tradeoffs between the two. Our analysis recommends reducing the initial time allotted to each case from 120 to 90 min, including a 30-min lunch buffer and end of the day buffer to absorb any delays, and potentially rescheduling inpatients when emergent cases have to be scheduled or other cases are taking longer than anticipated. We also perform detailed parametric analysis to develop more generic recommendations. The facility under study implemented our recommendations and realized a 19% increase in utilization as well as a 71% decrease in overtime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-55
Number of pages15
JournalHealth Systems
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Catheterization
Hospital beds
Buffers
Discrete event simulation
Operating costs
Lunch
Hospital Costs
Quality of Health Care
Population Density
Patient Satisfaction
Statistical Factor Analysis
Inpatients
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs

Keywords

  • catheterization labs
  • efficiency
  • health service
  • idle time
  • overtime
  • patient waiting time
  • simulation
  • utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Improving the process efficiency of catheterization laboratories using simulation. / Mohan, Srimathy; Li, Qing; Gopalakrishnan, Mohan; Fowler, John; Printezis, Antonios.

In: Health Systems, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 41-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4562b3703451487eba2f542ba721542a,
title = "Improving the process efficiency of catheterization laboratories using simulation",
abstract = "As the size of the population suffering from cardiac problems increases, the number of catheterization procedures performed is growing rapidly. The high costs associated with catheterization laboratories (cath labs) make managing these resources a critical task that impacts the efficiency and operating costs of hospitals as well as the quality of care. This study describes a discrete event simulation model developed to analyze the various factors that affect utilization of cath labs at a 337-bed full-service hospital in Scottsdale Arizona and provide decision support for improving the efficiency of the cath lab operations. The simulation model helped evaluate the performance of the existing approach at the hospital and compare alternative policies to improve operational efficiency. We consider both operational and patient satisfaction metrics and illustrate the tradeoffs between the two. Our analysis recommends reducing the initial time allotted to each case from 120 to 90 min, including a 30-min lunch buffer and end of the day buffer to absorb any delays, and potentially rescheduling inpatients when emergent cases have to be scheduled or other cases are taking longer than anticipated. We also perform detailed parametric analysis to develop more generic recommendations. The facility under study implemented our recommendations and realized a 19{\%} increase in utilization as well as a 71{\%} decrease in overtime.",
keywords = "catheterization labs, efficiency, health service, idle time, overtime, patient waiting time, simulation, utilization",
author = "Srimathy Mohan and Qing Li and Mohan Gopalakrishnan and John Fowler and Antonios Printezis",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1057/s41306-017-0025-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "41--55",
journal = "Health Systems",
issn = "2047-6965",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving the process efficiency of catheterization laboratories using simulation

AU - Mohan, Srimathy

AU - Li, Qing

AU - Gopalakrishnan, Mohan

AU - Fowler, John

AU - Printezis, Antonios

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - As the size of the population suffering from cardiac problems increases, the number of catheterization procedures performed is growing rapidly. The high costs associated with catheterization laboratories (cath labs) make managing these resources a critical task that impacts the efficiency and operating costs of hospitals as well as the quality of care. This study describes a discrete event simulation model developed to analyze the various factors that affect utilization of cath labs at a 337-bed full-service hospital in Scottsdale Arizona and provide decision support for improving the efficiency of the cath lab operations. The simulation model helped evaluate the performance of the existing approach at the hospital and compare alternative policies to improve operational efficiency. We consider both operational and patient satisfaction metrics and illustrate the tradeoffs between the two. Our analysis recommends reducing the initial time allotted to each case from 120 to 90 min, including a 30-min lunch buffer and end of the day buffer to absorb any delays, and potentially rescheduling inpatients when emergent cases have to be scheduled or other cases are taking longer than anticipated. We also perform detailed parametric analysis to develop more generic recommendations. The facility under study implemented our recommendations and realized a 19% increase in utilization as well as a 71% decrease in overtime.

AB - As the size of the population suffering from cardiac problems increases, the number of catheterization procedures performed is growing rapidly. The high costs associated with catheterization laboratories (cath labs) make managing these resources a critical task that impacts the efficiency and operating costs of hospitals as well as the quality of care. This study describes a discrete event simulation model developed to analyze the various factors that affect utilization of cath labs at a 337-bed full-service hospital in Scottsdale Arizona and provide decision support for improving the efficiency of the cath lab operations. The simulation model helped evaluate the performance of the existing approach at the hospital and compare alternative policies to improve operational efficiency. We consider both operational and patient satisfaction metrics and illustrate the tradeoffs between the two. Our analysis recommends reducing the initial time allotted to each case from 120 to 90 min, including a 30-min lunch buffer and end of the day buffer to absorb any delays, and potentially rescheduling inpatients when emergent cases have to be scheduled or other cases are taking longer than anticipated. We also perform detailed parametric analysis to develop more generic recommendations. The facility under study implemented our recommendations and realized a 19% increase in utilization as well as a 71% decrease in overtime.

KW - catheterization labs

KW - efficiency

KW - health service

KW - idle time

KW - overtime

KW - patient waiting time

KW - simulation

KW - utilization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075731342&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85075731342&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1057/s41306-017-0025-8

DO - 10.1057/s41306-017-0025-8

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85075731342

VL - 6

SP - 41

EP - 55

JO - Health Systems

JF - Health Systems

SN - 2047-6965

IS - 1

ER -