Improving technology literacy: Does it open doors to traditional content?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated whether an identifiable link existed between gains in technology literacy and achievement in the areas of reading, mathematics, and language arts. Normal curve equivalent (NCE) content score changes from TerraNova assessments were calculated for approximately 5,000 students from fourth- to fifth-grade and 5,000 students from seventh- to eighth-grade. These changes were compared to relative gains from a pre- to post-assessment in technology literacy. The rationale that a correlation might be expected is grounded in two ideas: (1) technology literacy gains lead to heightened subject specific confidence, and (2) technology literacy gains reflect improved ability to use technology as a mediator of new learning. If correct, both of these conjectures would predict increased academic achievement among students experiencing gains in technology literacy. Results provided evidence of such connections between technology literacy gains and language arts skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-284
Number of pages14
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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literacy
art
student
language
academic achievement
confidence
mathematics
ability
learning
evidence

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Language arts
  • Student achievement
  • Technology literacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Improving technology literacy : Does it open doors to traditional content? / Judson, Eugene.

In: Educational Technology Research and Development, Vol. 58, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 271-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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