Improving learning disabled students’ skills at revising essays produced on a word processor: Self-instructional strategy training

Stephen Graham, Charles MacArthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The present study was conducted to determine whether self-instructional strategy training would be effective in improving learning disabled students’ revising behavior and the essays they compose on a word processor. Training effects were investigated using a multiple baseline across subjects design, with multiple probes in baseline. Results indicated that strategy instruction had a positive effect on students’ revising behavior as well as on the length and quality of their written products. Effects were maintained over time and generalization to a paper-and-pencil writing task was also demonstrated. Following training, students reported that they were more confident in their ability to write and revise essays. Additionally, evidence on strategy usage and modification was collected.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages133-152
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Special Education
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Learning
Students
learning
Aptitude
student
instruction
ability
evidence
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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