Improving Classroom Learning by Collaboratively Observing Human Tutoring Videos While Problem Solving

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collaboratively observing tutoring is a promising method for observational learning (also referred to as vicarious learning). This method was tested in the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center's Physics LearnLab, where students were introduced to physics topics by observing videos while problem solving in Andes, a physics tutoring system. Students were randomly assigned to three groups: (a) pairs collaboratively observing videos of an expert human tutoring session, (b) pairs observing videos of expert problem solving, or (c) individuals observing expert problem solving. Immediate learning measures did not display group differences; however, long-term retention and transfer measures showed consistent differences favoring collaboratively observing tutoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-789
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Physics
video
Learning
physics
classroom
expert
learning
Students
Group
student
science

Keywords

  • collaboration
  • observational learning
  • physics
  • problem solving
  • vicarious learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

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