Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget

Mary Anderson-Rowland, Caroline Vaningen-Dunn, Debra Banks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In fall 2003, collaboration was begun between the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University and five community colleges belonging to the Maricopa County Community College District. Funded by a joint grant from the National Science Foundation, each with their own budget, the collaborators set out to develop a program that would interest and support community college students in engineering, ease their transition to a large university, and continue to support them after the transfer, especially for the first year. The program also was designed to especially encourage and support women and underrepresented minority students. The program is called METS: Maricopa Engineering Transition Scholars. Most of the plans for the project as proposed have been successful, including a METS Center in the Fulton School. In addition, one of the research areas was to develop a model administration for such collaboration. The administration of the grant, however, has proved to be a challenge. The five community colleges each have their own administration and way of doing things, so the METS administration was much more complicated than just a collaboration of a university and one community college. After a two-year pilot, the major grant ended and the program was continued on an extension, but with a much reduced budget. To continue the program administrative support had to be reduced. This paper will describe how the program is now functioning on a reduced budget and the advantages of the new administrative model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2006
Event113th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition, 2006 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2006Jun 21 2006

Other

Other113th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition, 2006
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/18/066/21/06

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Anderson-Rowland, M., Vaningen-Dunn, C., & Banks, D. (2006). Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings

Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget. / Anderson-Rowland, Mary; Vaningen-Dunn, Caroline; Banks, Debra.

ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Anderson-Rowland, M, Vaningen-Dunn, C & Banks, D 2006, Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget. in ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 113th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition, 2006, Chicago, IL, United States, 6/18/06.
Anderson-Rowland M, Vaningen-Dunn C, Banks D. Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2006
Anderson-Rowland, Mary ; Vaningen-Dunn, Caroline ; Banks, Debra. / Improving a university/community college partnership program having a reduced budget. ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2006.
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