Improved Prediction of Imminent Progression to Clinically Significant Memory Decline Using Surface Multivariate Morphometry Statistics and Sparse Coding

Cynthia M. Stonnington, Jianfeng Wu, Jie Zhang, Jie Shi, Robert J. Bauer, Vivek Devadas, Yi Su, Dona E.C. Locke, Eric M. Reiman, Richard J. Caselli, Kewei Chen, Yalin Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Besides their other roles, brain imaging and other biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have the potential to inform a cognitively unimpaired (CU) person's likelihood of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and benefit subject selection when evaluating promising prevention therapies. We previously described that among baseline FDG-PET and MRI measures known to be preferentially affected in the preclinical and clinical stages of AD, hippocampal volume was the best predictor of incident MCI within 2 years (79%sensitivity/78%specificity), using standard automated MRI volumetric algorithmic programs, binary logistic regression, and leave-one-out procedures. Objective: To improve the same prediction by using different hippocampal features and machine learning methods, cross-validated via two independent and prospective cohorts (Arizona and ADNI). Methods: Patch-based sparse coding algorithms were applied to hippocampal surface features of baseline TI-MRIs from 78 CU adults who subsequently progressed to amnestic MCI in approximately 2 years ('progressors') and 80 matched adults who remained CU for at least 4 years ('nonprogressors'). Nonprogressors and progressors were matched for age, sex, education, and apolipoprotein E4 allele dose. We did not include amyloid or tau biomarkers in defining MCI. Results: We achieved 92%prediction accuracy in the Arizona cohort, 92%prediction accuracy in the ADNI cohort, and 90%prediction accuracy when combining the two demographically distinct cohorts, as compared to 79%(Arizona) and 72%(ADNI) prediction accuracy using hippocampal volume. Conclusion: Surface multivariate morphometry and sparse coding, applied to individual MRIs, may accurately predict imminent progression to MCI even in the absence of other AD biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-220
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • prediction
  • prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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