Implicit and explicit attitudes toward cigarette smoking: The effects of context and motivation

Steven J. Sherman, Jennifer S. Rose, Kelly Koch, Clark C. Presson, Laurie Chassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies examined the effects of context and motivational state on two implicit measures of attitudes toward smoking (priming [Fazio, Jackson, Dunton, & Williams, 1996] and the Implicit Association Test [IAT; Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998]) as well as on explicit attitudes among nonsmokers and smokers. The priming measure was sensitive to changes in the salience of different aspects of smoking and to changes in motivational state (nicotine deprivation). There were only modest relations between explicit and implicit attitudes, and the two implicit measures were generally uncorrelated. These results have implications for the complexity and ambivalence of attitudes toward smoking held by smokers and for interventions that seek to change their altitudes and smoking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-39
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2003

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Motivation
Smoking
Nicotine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Implicit and explicit attitudes toward cigarette smoking : The effects of context and motivation. / Sherman, Steven J.; Rose, Jennifer S.; Koch, Kelly; Presson, Clark C.; Chassin, Laurie.

In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 02.2003, p. 13-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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