Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Predict Smoking Cessation: Moderating Effects of Experienced Failure to Control Smoking and Plans to Quit

Laurie Chassin, Clark Presson, Steven J. Sherman, Dong Chul Seo, Jonathan T. Macy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study tested implicit and explicit attitudes as prospective predictors of smoking cessation in a Midwestern community sample of smokers. Results showed that the effects of attitudes significantly varied with levels of experienced failure to control smoking and plans to quit. Explicit attitudes significantly predicted later cessation among those with low (but not high or average) levels of experienced failure to control smoking. Conversely, however, implicit attitudes significantly predicted later cessation among those with high levels of experienced failure to control smoking, but only if they had a plan to quit. Because smoking cessation involves both controlled and automatic processes, interventions may need to consider attitude change interventions that focus on both implicit and explicit attitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)670-679
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Implicit and explicit attitudes
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Predict Smoking Cessation: Moderating Effects of Experienced Failure to Control Smoking and Plans to Quit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this