Implementation of strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in U.S. hospitals

Marcia M. Ward, Daniel J. Diekema, Jon W. Yankey, Thomas E. Vaughn, Bonnie J. BootsMiller, Jane F. Pendergast, Bradley Doebbeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which the strategies recommended by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID)-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) co-sponsored workshop, Antimicrobial Resistance in Hospitals: Strategies to Improve Antimicrobial Use and Prevent Nosocomial Transmission of Antimicrobial-Resistant Microorganisms, have been implemented and the relationship between the degree of implementation and hospital culture, leadership, and organizational factors. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: A representative sample of U.S. hospitals stratified by teaching status, bed size, and geographic region. PARTICIPANTS: Infection control professionals. RESULTS: Surveyed hospitals had implemented strategies to optimize the use of antimicrobials and to detect, report, and prevent transmission of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. Multivariate analyses found that hospitals with a greater degree of implementation of the NFID-CDC strategic goals were more likely to have management support, education of staff, and interdisciplinary groups specifically to address these issues; they were also more likely to engage in benchmarking on broader quality of care indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Most surveyed hospitals had implemented some measures to address the NFID-CDC recommendations; however, hospitals need to do much more to improve antimicrobial use and to increase their efforts to detect, report, and control the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A supportive hospital administration must foster a culture of ongoing support, education, and interdisciplinary work groups focused on this important issue to successfully accomplish these goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-30
Number of pages10
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Communicable Diseases
Education
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospital Administration
Organizational Culture
Benchmarking
Quality of Health Care
Infection Control
Teaching Hospitals
Multivariate Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Implementation of strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in U.S. hospitals. / Ward, Marcia M.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Yankey, Jon W.; Vaughn, Thomas E.; BootsMiller, Bonnie J.; Pendergast, Jane F.; Doebbeling, Bradley.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 21-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ward, Marcia M. ; Diekema, Daniel J. ; Yankey, Jon W. ; Vaughn, Thomas E. ; BootsMiller, Bonnie J. ; Pendergast, Jane F. ; Doebbeling, Bradley. / Implementation of strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in U.S. hospitals. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2005 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 21-30.
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