Implementation of a biomedical engineering research experience for African-American high school students at a tier one research university

Cherie M. Avent, Ayesha S. Boyce, Lakeita D. Servance, Lizanne A. DeStefano, Robert M. Nerem, Manu O. Platt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Enriching science experiences and competencies for underrepresented students during high school years is crucial to increasing their entry into the science pipeline and to improving their preparedness for success in college and STEM careers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of project ENGAGES, a high school STEM year-long research program for African-American students, mentored by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers at Georgia Tech. It aims to provide an authentic research experience and expose student to the possibility and benefits of attaining an advanced degree and careers in STEM fields. Initial program outcomes include student reported satisfaction with research experience, improved technical skill development, and increased curiosity and interest in STEM careers. Additionally, students indicated increases in college readiness, research skill development, and exposure to STEM careers as a result of interactions with faculty advisors and graduate student mentors, along with laboratory assignments. Lessons learned and potential pitfalls and barriers to acceptance are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number084701-1
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume140
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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