Implantable Medical Device Tells All: Uberveillance Gets to the Heart of the Matter

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2015, I provided evidence at an Australian inquiry into the use of subsection 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act of 1997 by government agencies to disrupt the operation of illegal online services [1]. I stated to the Standing Committee on Infrastructure and Communications that mandatory metadata retention laws meant blanket coverage surveillance for Australians and visitors to Australia. The intent behind asking Australian service providers to keep subscriber search history data for up to two years was to grant government and law enforcement organizations the ability to search Internet Protocol-based records in the event of suspected criminal activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages107-115
Number of pages9
Volume6
No4
Specialist publicationIEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Internet protocols
Law enforcement
Metadata
Telecommunication
History
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Implantable Medical Device Tells All : Uberveillance Gets to the Heart of the Matter. / Michael, Katina.

In: IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 4, 10.2017, p. 107-115.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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