Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts

Treavor Boyer, Evan Ged, Louis Motz, Paul Chadik, Kathryn Frank, Christopher P. Hill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Population growth, urbanization, and climate change are expected to increase the global demand for freshwater while at the same time decrease the quality of available water supplies. In particular, coastal urbanization and sea-level rise resulting from climate change are expected to increase intrusion of saltwater and subsequent contamination of fresh groundwater. In the past the major concern with this contamination was chloride and sodium, which are the major constituents of saltwater and cause unpalatable taste. An overlooked process during saltwater intrusion is the co-transport of bromide with chloride. Although bromide is present in saltwater at much lower concentrations than chloride, bromide can form disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment whereas chloride is only an aesthetic concern. Accordingly, the objective of this research is to quantify the impacts of saltwater intrusion on the potential to alter groundwater chemistry and form DBPs during drinking water treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013 - Long Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 3 2013Nov 7 2013

Other

Other2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach, CA
Period11/3/1311/7/13

Fingerprint

saline intrusion
disinfection
bromide
chloride
urbanization
climate change
groundwater
esthetics
population growth
water supply
sodium
sea level rise
drinking water treatment
contamination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Boyer, T., Ged, E., Motz, L., Chadik, P., Frank, K., & Hill, C. P. (2013). Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts. In 2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013

Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts. / Boyer, Treavor; Ged, Evan; Motz, Louis; Chadik, Paul; Frank, Kathryn; Hill, Christopher P.

2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013. 2013.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Boyer, T, Ged, E, Motz, L, Chadik, P, Frank, K & Hill, CP 2013, Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts. in 2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013. 2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013, Long Beach, CA, United States, 11/3/13.
Boyer T, Ged E, Motz L, Chadik P, Frank K, Hill CP. Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts. In 2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013. 2013
Boyer, Treavor ; Ged, Evan ; Motz, Louis ; Chadik, Paul ; Frank, Kathryn ; Hill, Christopher P. / Impact of sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion and formation of brominated disinfection byproducts. 2013 Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition, WQTC 2013. 2013.
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