Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information

Cristobal Hiche, Clyde K. Coelho, Aditi Chattopadhyay, Mark Seaver

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Localization of low energy impacts on carbon fiber composites is an important aspect of structural health monitoring since it creates subsurface damage which can significantly reduce the stiffness of a component. A novel impact localization method is proposed based on the strain amplitude measured by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. The algorithm is based on the relative placement of all sensors and the maximum strain amplitude measured by each sensor. This method requires minimal knowledge of the material or the structure and a minimum number of sensors. The algorithm showed good results on both simulated and experimental test cases of woven composite plates. It was found that a minimum of five FBG are necessary to accurately predict the impact location on a plate. The algorithm was also tested on a woven composite wing showing good localization along the span of the wing but higher errors along the chord length due to the nonlinearity in the measured strains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7649
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
EventNondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2010 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Mar 8 2010Mar 11 2010

Other

OtherNondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period3/8/103/11/10

Fingerprint

Fiber Grating
Fiber Bragg gratings
Bragg Grating
Complex Structure
Bragg gratings
woven composites
Sensor
fibers
sensors
Sensors
Composite
Subsurface Damage
wings
Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor
Composite materials
Composite Plates
Carbon Fiber
Health Monitoring
Chord or secant line
Placement

Keywords

  • FBG sensing
  • Impact localization
  • low velocity impacts
  • strain amplitude
  • woven composites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Hiche, C., Coelho, C. K., Chattopadhyay, A., & Seaver, M. (2010). Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 7649). [764903] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.848872

Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information. / Hiche, Cristobal; Coelho, Clyde K.; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seaver, Mark.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7649 2010. 764903.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hiche, C, Coelho, CK, Chattopadhyay, A & Seaver, M 2010, Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 7649, 764903, Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2010, San Diego, CA, United States, 3/8/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.848872
Hiche C, Coelho CK, Chattopadhyay A, Seaver M. Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7649. 2010. 764903 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.848872
Hiche, Cristobal ; Coelho, Clyde K. ; Chattopadhyay, Aditi ; Seaver, Mark. / Impact localization on complex structures using FBG strain amplitude information. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7649 2010.
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