Impact desolvation of electrosprayed microdroplets - A new ionization method for mass spectrometry of large biomolecules

Sergei A. Aksyonov, Peter Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Impact desolvation of electrosprayed microdroplets (IDEM) is a new method for producing gas-phase ions of large biomolecules. Analytes are dissolved in an electrolyte solution which is electrosprayed in vacuum, producing highly charged micron and sub-micron sized droplets (microdroplets). These microdroplets are accelerated through potential differences ∼5-10 kV to velocities of several km/s and allowed to impact a target surface. The energetic impacts vaporize the droplets and release desolvated gas-phase ions of the analyte molecules. Oligonucleotides (2- to 12-mer) and peptides (bradykinin, neurotensin) yield singly and doubly charged molecular ions with no detectable fragmentation. Because the extent of multiple charging is significantly less than in atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization, and the method produces ions largely free of adducts from solutions of high ionic strength, IDEM has some promise as a method for coupling to liquid chromatographic techniques and for mixture analysis. Ions are produced in vacuum at a flat equipotential surface, potentially allowing efficient ion extraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2001-2006
Number of pages6
JournalRapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
Volume15
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Biomolecules
Ionization
Mass spectrometry
Ions
Gases
Vacuum
Electrospray ionization
Neurotensin
Bradykinin
Ionic strength
Oligonucleotides
Electrolytes
Atmospheric pressure
Peptides
Molecules
Liquids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

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abstract = "Impact desolvation of electrosprayed microdroplets (IDEM) is a new method for producing gas-phase ions of large biomolecules. Analytes are dissolved in an electrolyte solution which is electrosprayed in vacuum, producing highly charged micron and sub-micron sized droplets (microdroplets). These microdroplets are accelerated through potential differences ∼5-10 kV to velocities of several km/s and allowed to impact a target surface. The energetic impacts vaporize the droplets and release desolvated gas-phase ions of the analyte molecules. Oligonucleotides (2- to 12-mer) and peptides (bradykinin, neurotensin) yield singly and doubly charged molecular ions with no detectable fragmentation. Because the extent of multiple charging is significantly less than in atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization, and the method produces ions largely free of adducts from solutions of high ionic strength, IDEM has some promise as a method for coupling to liquid chromatographic techniques and for mixture analysis. Ions are produced in vacuum at a flat equipotential surface, potentially allowing efficient ion extraction.",
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AU - Aksyonov, Sergei A.

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N2 - Impact desolvation of electrosprayed microdroplets (IDEM) is a new method for producing gas-phase ions of large biomolecules. Analytes are dissolved in an electrolyte solution which is electrosprayed in vacuum, producing highly charged micron and sub-micron sized droplets (microdroplets). These microdroplets are accelerated through potential differences ∼5-10 kV to velocities of several km/s and allowed to impact a target surface. The energetic impacts vaporize the droplets and release desolvated gas-phase ions of the analyte molecules. Oligonucleotides (2- to 12-mer) and peptides (bradykinin, neurotensin) yield singly and doubly charged molecular ions with no detectable fragmentation. Because the extent of multiple charging is significantly less than in atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization, and the method produces ions largely free of adducts from solutions of high ionic strength, IDEM has some promise as a method for coupling to liquid chromatographic techniques and for mixture analysis. Ions are produced in vacuum at a flat equipotential surface, potentially allowing efficient ion extraction.

AB - Impact desolvation of electrosprayed microdroplets (IDEM) is a new method for producing gas-phase ions of large biomolecules. Analytes are dissolved in an electrolyte solution which is electrosprayed in vacuum, producing highly charged micron and sub-micron sized droplets (microdroplets). These microdroplets are accelerated through potential differences ∼5-10 kV to velocities of several km/s and allowed to impact a target surface. The energetic impacts vaporize the droplets and release desolvated gas-phase ions of the analyte molecules. Oligonucleotides (2- to 12-mer) and peptides (bradykinin, neurotensin) yield singly and doubly charged molecular ions with no detectable fragmentation. Because the extent of multiple charging is significantly less than in atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization, and the method produces ions largely free of adducts from solutions of high ionic strength, IDEM has some promise as a method for coupling to liquid chromatographic techniques and for mixture analysis. Ions are produced in vacuum at a flat equipotential surface, potentially allowing efficient ion extraction.

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