Immunogenicity in humans of an edible vaccine for hepatitis B

Yasmin Thanavala, Martin Mahoney, Sribani Pal, Adrienne Scott, Liz Richter, Nachimuthu Natarajan, Patti Goodwin, Charles J. Arntzen, Hugh Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

209 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the immunogenicity of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expressed in potatoes and delivered orally to previously vaccinated individuals. The potatoes accumulated HBsAg at ≈8.5 μg/g of potato tuber, and doses of 100 g of tuber were administered by ingestion. The correlate of protection for hepatitis B virus, a nonenteric pathogen, is blood serum antibody titers against HBsAg. After volunteers ate uncooked potatoes, serum anti-HBsAg titers increased in 10 of 16 volunteers (62.5%) who ate three doses of potatoes; in 9 of 17 volunteers (52.9%) who ate two doses of transgenic potatoes; and in none of the volunteers who ate nontransgenic potatoes. These results were achieved without the coadministration of a mucosal adjuvant or the need for buffering stomach pH. We conclude that a plant-derived orally delivered vaccine for prevention of hepatitis B virus should be considered as a viable component of a global immunization program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3378-3382
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Edible Vaccines
Solanum tuberosum
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Volunteers
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Immunization Programs
Controlled Clinical Trials
Serum
Stomach
Vaccines
Eating
Placebos

Keywords

  • Mucosal immune response
  • Oral vaccine
  • Surface antigen
  • Transgenic plant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Immunogenicity in humans of an edible vaccine for hepatitis B. / Thanavala, Yasmin; Mahoney, Martin; Pal, Sribani; Scott, Adrienne; Richter, Liz; Natarajan, Nachimuthu; Goodwin, Patti; Arntzen, Charles J.; Mason, Hugh.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 102, No. 9, 01.03.2005, p. 3378-3382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thanavala, Y, Mahoney, M, Pal, S, Scott, A, Richter, L, Natarajan, N, Goodwin, P, Arntzen, CJ & Mason, H 2005, 'Immunogenicity in humans of an edible vaccine for hepatitis B', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 9, pp. 3378-3382. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0409899102
Thanavala, Yasmin ; Mahoney, Martin ; Pal, Sribani ; Scott, Adrienne ; Richter, Liz ; Natarajan, Nachimuthu ; Goodwin, Patti ; Arntzen, Charles J. ; Mason, Hugh. / Immunogenicity in humans of an edible vaccine for hepatitis B. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2005 ; Vol. 102, No. 9. pp. 3378-3382.
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