Identity in written discourse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides an overview of theoretical and research issues in the study of writer identity in written discourse. First, a historical overview explores how identity has been conceived, studied, and taught, followed by a discussion of how writer identity has been conceptualized. Next, three major orientations toward writer identity show how the focus of analysis has shifted from the individual to the social conventions and how it has been moving toward an equilibrium, in which the negotiation of individual and social perspectives is recognized. The next two sections discuss two of the key developments - identity in academic writing and the assessment of writer identity. The article concludes with a brief discussion of the implications and future directions for teaching and researching identity in written discourse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-159
Number of pages20
JournalAnnual Review of Applied Linguistics
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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discourse
writer
Writer Identity
Written Discourse
Teaching
Academic Writing
Social Conventions
Historical Overview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Identity in written discourse. / Matsuda, Paul.

In: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 35, 2015, p. 140-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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