Identifying victims of peer aggression from early to middle childhood: Analysis of cross-informant data for concordance, estimation of relational adjustment, prevalence of victimization, and characteristics of identified victims

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Abstract

Two studies were conducted to investigate cross-informant measures of children's peer victimization. In Study 1, self- and peer reports of victimization were compared for 197 children from Kindergarten (M age = 5.73) to Grade 4. Before Grade 2, peer reports were less reliable than self-reports and were poor estimators of relational adjustment. In Study 2, single-versus multiple-informant (self, peer. teacher, parent) victimization measures were compared for 392 children across grades 2 (M age = 8.73) to 4. Results indicated that (a) data from the four informants were reliable and increasingly concordant over time, (b) no single-informant measure proved to be the best predictor of relational adjustment, and (c) a multi-informant composite measure yielded better estimates of relational adjustment than any singleinformant measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-96
Number of pages23
JournalPsychological Assessment
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 20 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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