Identifying the potential for cross-fishery spillovers: A network analysis of alaskan permitting patterns

Ethan T. Addicott, Kailin Kroetz, Matthew N. Reimer, James N. Sanchirico, Daniel K. Lew, Justine Huetteman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many fishers own a portfolio of permits across multiple fisheries, creating an opportunity for fishing effort to adjust across fisheries and enabling impacts from a policy change in one fishery to spill over into other fisheries. In regions with a large and diverse number of permits and fisheries, joint-permitting can result in a complex system, making it difficult to understand the potential for cross-fishery substitution. In this study, we construct a network representation of permit ownership to characterize interconnectedness among Alaska commercial fisheries due to cross-fishery permitting. The Alaska fisheries network is highly connected, suggesting that most fisheries are vulnerable to cross-fishery spillovers from network shocks, such as changes to policies or fish stocks. We find that fisheries with similar geographic proximity are more likely to be a part of a highly connected cluster of susceptible fisheries. We use a case study to show that preexisting network statistics can be useful for identifying the potential scope of policy-induced spillovers. Our results demonstrate that network analysis can improve our understanding of the potential for policy-induced cross-fishery spillovers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-68
Number of pages13
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

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