Identifying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infections in mice via breath analysis using secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS)

Heather Bean, Jiangjiang Zhu, Jackson C. Sengle, Jane E. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious health threat, causing an estimated 11 000 deaths per year in the United States. MRSA pneumonias account for 16% of invasive infections, and can be difficult to detect as the current state-of-the-art diagnostics require that bacterial DNA is recovered from the infection site. Because 60% of patients with invasive infections die within 7 d of culturing positive for MRSA, earlier detection of the pathogen may significantly reduce mortality. We aim to develop breath-based diagnostics that can detect Staphylococcal lung infections rapidly and non-invasively, and discriminate MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), in situ. Using a murine lung infection model, we have demonstrated that secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprinting can be used to robustly identify isogenic strains of MRSA and MSSA in the lung 24 h after bacterial inoculation. Principal components analysis (PCA) separates MRSA and MSSA breathprints using only the first component (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number041001
JournalJournal of Breath Research
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Lung
Methicillin
Infection
Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcal Pneumonia
Staphylococcal Infections
Bacterial DNA
Principal Component Analysis
Mortality
Health

Keywords

  • breath
  • diagnostics
  • lung infections
  • MRSA
  • SESI-MS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Identifying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infections in mice via breath analysis using secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS). / Bean, Heather; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Sengle, Jackson C.; Hill, Jane E.

In: Journal of Breath Research, Vol. 8, No. 4, 041001, 01.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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