"I identify with her," "I identify with him": Unpacking the dynamics of personal identification in organizations

Blake Ashforth, Beth S. Schinoff, Kristie M. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite recognizing the importance of personal identification in organizations, researchers have rarely explored its dynamics. We define personal identification as perceived oneness with another individual, where one defines oneself in terms of the other. While many scholars have found that personal identification is associated with helpful effects, others have found it harmful. To resolve this contradiction, we distinguish between three paths to personal identification-threat-focused, opportunityfocused, and closeness-focused paths-and articulate a model that includes each. We examine the contextual features, how individuals' identities are constructed, and the likely outcomes that follow in the three paths. We conclude with a discussion of how the threat-, opportunity-, and closeness-focused personal identification processes potentially blend, as well as implications for future research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-60
Number of pages33
JournalAcademy of Management Review
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Closeness
Threat
Blends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

"I identify with her," "I identify with him" : Unpacking the dynamics of personal identification in organizations. / Ashforth, Blake; Schinoff, Beth S.; Rogers, Kristie M.

In: Academy of Management Review, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 28-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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