Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient: Case report and review of the literature

Javier A. Adachi, Ellen M. Grimm, Philip Johnson, Margaret Uthman, Bruce Kaplan, Robert M. Rakita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Human ehrlichiosis, a newly described zoonotic infection, can be classified as human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) or human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE). Although the clinical manifestations of HME and HGE are similar, the type of leukocyte infected, the etiologic agent, and the tick vector are distinct. Methods. We report the first case of HGE in a solid organ transplant recipient and review the literature on HGE. Results. Our patient displayed typical epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and responded promptly to therapy with doxycycline. Conclusions. Although opportunistic infections are relatively common in the posttransplant population, one must always consider other infections that occur in normal hosts as well. Human ehrlichiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for transplant patients with fever, cytopenias, and hepatitis, especially if exposure to ticks in endemic areas has occurred.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1142
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation
Volume64
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ehrlichiosis
Transplants
Kidney
Ticks
Doxycycline
Opportunistic Infections
Zoonoses
Hepatitis
Leukocytes
Differential Diagnosis
Fever

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Adachi, J. A., Grimm, E. M., Johnson, P., Uthman, M., Kaplan, B., & Rakita, R. M. (1997). Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient: Case report and review of the literature. Transplantation, 64(8), 1139-1142. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199710270-00010

Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient : Case report and review of the literature. / Adachi, Javier A.; Grimm, Ellen M.; Johnson, Philip; Uthman, Margaret; Kaplan, Bruce; Rakita, Robert M.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 64, No. 8, 27.10.1997, p. 1139-1142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adachi, JA, Grimm, EM, Johnson, P, Uthman, M, Kaplan, B & Rakita, RM 1997, 'Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient: Case report and review of the literature', Transplantation, vol. 64, no. 8, pp. 1139-1142. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199710270-00010
Adachi, Javier A. ; Grimm, Ellen M. ; Johnson, Philip ; Uthman, Margaret ; Kaplan, Bruce ; Rakita, Robert M. / Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient : Case report and review of the literature. In: Transplantation. 1997 ; Vol. 64, No. 8. pp. 1139-1142.
@article{2ffa1228592546ec8654dfa83eb3db34,
title = "Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient: Case report and review of the literature",
abstract = "Background. Human ehrlichiosis, a newly described zoonotic infection, can be classified as human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) or human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE). Although the clinical manifestations of HME and HGE are similar, the type of leukocyte infected, the etiologic agent, and the tick vector are distinct. Methods. We report the first case of HGE in a solid organ transplant recipient and review the literature on HGE. Results. Our patient displayed typical epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and responded promptly to therapy with doxycycline. Conclusions. Although opportunistic infections are relatively common in the posttransplant population, one must always consider other infections that occur in normal hosts as well. Human ehrlichiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for transplant patients with fever, cytopenias, and hepatitis, especially if exposure to ticks in endemic areas has occurred.",
author = "Adachi, {Javier A.} and Grimm, {Ellen M.} and Philip Johnson and Margaret Uthman and Bruce Kaplan and Rakita, {Robert M.}",
year = "1997",
month = "10",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1097/00007890-199710270-00010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "1139--1142",
journal = "Transplantation",
issn = "0041-1337",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in a renal transplant patient

T2 - Case report and review of the literature

AU - Adachi, Javier A.

AU - Grimm, Ellen M.

AU - Johnson, Philip

AU - Uthman, Margaret

AU - Kaplan, Bruce

AU - Rakita, Robert M.

PY - 1997/10/27

Y1 - 1997/10/27

N2 - Background. Human ehrlichiosis, a newly described zoonotic infection, can be classified as human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) or human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE). Although the clinical manifestations of HME and HGE are similar, the type of leukocyte infected, the etiologic agent, and the tick vector are distinct. Methods. We report the first case of HGE in a solid organ transplant recipient and review the literature on HGE. Results. Our patient displayed typical epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and responded promptly to therapy with doxycycline. Conclusions. Although opportunistic infections are relatively common in the posttransplant population, one must always consider other infections that occur in normal hosts as well. Human ehrlichiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for transplant patients with fever, cytopenias, and hepatitis, especially if exposure to ticks in endemic areas has occurred.

AB - Background. Human ehrlichiosis, a newly described zoonotic infection, can be classified as human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) or human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE). Although the clinical manifestations of HME and HGE are similar, the type of leukocyte infected, the etiologic agent, and the tick vector are distinct. Methods. We report the first case of HGE in a solid organ transplant recipient and review the literature on HGE. Results. Our patient displayed typical epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and responded promptly to therapy with doxycycline. Conclusions. Although opportunistic infections are relatively common in the posttransplant population, one must always consider other infections that occur in normal hosts as well. Human ehrlichiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for transplant patients with fever, cytopenias, and hepatitis, especially if exposure to ticks in endemic areas has occurred.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030671041&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030671041&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007890-199710270-00010

DO - 10.1097/00007890-199710270-00010

M3 - Article

C2 - 9355830

AN - SCOPUS:0030671041

VL - 64

SP - 1139

EP - 1142

JO - Transplantation

JF - Transplantation

SN - 0041-1337

IS - 8

ER -