Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity

Douglas A. Granger, Alan Booth, David R. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: A pattern of clinical, behavioral, and experimental findings suggests that individual differences in aggressive behavior may be related to immunologic processes. We evaluated two conflicting models of the relationship: 1) A positive association stems from an adaptive mechanism protecting aggressive individuals from increased exposure to immune stimuli and 2) a negative association is due to potential immunosuppressive effects of high testosterone levels. Methods: We investigated the models using enumerative measures of cellular and humoral immunity in a sample of 4415 men aged 30 to 48 years who were interviewed and underwent a medical examination. Results: Analysis revealed positive (and curvilinear) associations between aggressive behavior and enumerative measures of helper/inducer and suppressor/cytolytic T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. The aggression-immunity relationship was independent of testosterone level, age, current health status, and negative health behaviors and was most pronounced for helper/inducer T cells. There was no evidence of a negative association between testosterone and any immune measure. Conclusions: In a large sample of men, individual differences in aggressive behavior were positively associated with enumerative measures of cellular immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-590
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume62
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Testosterone
Immunity
Individuality
Cellular Immunity
Health Behavior
Immunosuppressive Agents
Humoral Immunity
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Aggression
Health Status
B-Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Cellular immunity
  • Health behavior
  • Health status
  • Testosterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Granger, D. A., Booth, A., & Johnson, D. R. (2000). Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity. Psychosomatic Medicine, 62(4), 583-590.

Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity. / Granger, Douglas A.; Booth, Alan; Johnson, David R.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 62, No. 4, 2000, p. 583-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Granger, DA, Booth, A & Johnson, DR 2000, 'Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity', Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 583-590.
Granger DA, Booth A, Johnson DR. Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2000;62(4):583-590.
Granger, Douglas A. ; Booth, Alan ; Johnson, David R. / Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 583-590.
@article{4927aec6067a4f42aceceaa0e8d5e9d0,
title = "Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity",
abstract = "Objective: A pattern of clinical, behavioral, and experimental findings suggests that individual differences in aggressive behavior may be related to immunologic processes. We evaluated two conflicting models of the relationship: 1) A positive association stems from an adaptive mechanism protecting aggressive individuals from increased exposure to immune stimuli and 2) a negative association is due to potential immunosuppressive effects of high testosterone levels. Methods: We investigated the models using enumerative measures of cellular and humoral immunity in a sample of 4415 men aged 30 to 48 years who were interviewed and underwent a medical examination. Results: Analysis revealed positive (and curvilinear) associations between aggressive behavior and enumerative measures of helper/inducer and suppressor/cytolytic T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. The aggression-immunity relationship was independent of testosterone level, age, current health status, and negative health behaviors and was most pronounced for helper/inducer T cells. There was no evidence of a negative association between testosterone and any immune measure. Conclusions: In a large sample of men, individual differences in aggressive behavior were positively associated with enumerative measures of cellular immunity.",
keywords = "Aggression, Cellular immunity, Health behavior, Health status, Testosterone",
author = "Granger, {Douglas A.} and Alan Booth and Johnson, {David R.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "62",
pages = "583--590",
journal = "Psychosomatic Medicine",
issn = "0033-3174",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human agression and enumerative measures of immunity

AU - Granger, Douglas A.

AU - Booth, Alan

AU - Johnson, David R.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Objective: A pattern of clinical, behavioral, and experimental findings suggests that individual differences in aggressive behavior may be related to immunologic processes. We evaluated two conflicting models of the relationship: 1) A positive association stems from an adaptive mechanism protecting aggressive individuals from increased exposure to immune stimuli and 2) a negative association is due to potential immunosuppressive effects of high testosterone levels. Methods: We investigated the models using enumerative measures of cellular and humoral immunity in a sample of 4415 men aged 30 to 48 years who were interviewed and underwent a medical examination. Results: Analysis revealed positive (and curvilinear) associations between aggressive behavior and enumerative measures of helper/inducer and suppressor/cytolytic T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. The aggression-immunity relationship was independent of testosterone level, age, current health status, and negative health behaviors and was most pronounced for helper/inducer T cells. There was no evidence of a negative association between testosterone and any immune measure. Conclusions: In a large sample of men, individual differences in aggressive behavior were positively associated with enumerative measures of cellular immunity.

AB - Objective: A pattern of clinical, behavioral, and experimental findings suggests that individual differences in aggressive behavior may be related to immunologic processes. We evaluated two conflicting models of the relationship: 1) A positive association stems from an adaptive mechanism protecting aggressive individuals from increased exposure to immune stimuli and 2) a negative association is due to potential immunosuppressive effects of high testosterone levels. Methods: We investigated the models using enumerative measures of cellular and humoral immunity in a sample of 4415 men aged 30 to 48 years who were interviewed and underwent a medical examination. Results: Analysis revealed positive (and curvilinear) associations between aggressive behavior and enumerative measures of helper/inducer and suppressor/cytolytic T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. The aggression-immunity relationship was independent of testosterone level, age, current health status, and negative health behaviors and was most pronounced for helper/inducer T cells. There was no evidence of a negative association between testosterone and any immune measure. Conclusions: In a large sample of men, individual differences in aggressive behavior were positively associated with enumerative measures of cellular immunity.

KW - Aggression

KW - Cellular immunity

KW - Health behavior

KW - Health status

KW - Testosterone

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033624191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033624191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 62

SP - 583

EP - 590

JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

IS - 4

ER -