Human affection exchange

XII. Affectionate communication is associated with diurnal variation in salivary free cortisol

Kory Floyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study tested the general hypothesis that, irrespective of the amount of affectionate communication one typically receives, the amount of affectionate communication one typically expresses to others is associated with the body's ability to handle stress. Twenty healthy young adults reported on their trait levels of expressed and received affection and then took four saliva samples over the course of a normal workday. The saliva samples were assayed for levels of free cortisol, an adrenal steroid hormone associated with physiological responses to stress. Controlling for received affection, expressed affection was strongly and positively associated with waking cortisol values and with aggregate values. It was also strongly and positively related to the magnitude of morning-to-evening decrease in cortisol levels, a rhythm indicative of an adaptive ability to handle stress. Theoretic and methodological implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-63
Number of pages17
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

Fingerprint

Cortisol
sympathy
communication
Communication
Steroid hormones
ability
young adult
Values
Affection

Keywords

  • Affection
  • Affection Exchange Theory
  • Cortisol
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Human affection exchange : XII. Affectionate communication is associated with diurnal variation in salivary free cortisol. / Floyd, Kory.

In: Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 70, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 47-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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