Human Affection Exchange: VI. Further Tests of Reproductive Probability as a Predictor of Men's Affection With Their Adult Sons

Kory Floyd, Jack E. Sargent, Mark Di Corcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the communication of affection in men's relationships with their fathers. Drawing from Affection Exchange Theory, the authors advanced four predictions: (a) heterosexual men receive more affection from their own fathers than do homosexual or bisexual men, (b) fathers communicate affection to their sons more through supportive activities than through direct verbal statements or nonverbal gestures, (c) affectionate communication between fathers and sons is linearly related to closeness and inter-personal involvement between them, and (d) fathers' awareness of their sons' sexual orientation is associated with the amount of affection that the fathers communicate to them. Participants were 170 adult men who completed questionnaires regarding affectionate communication in their relationships with their fathers. Half of the men were self-identified as exclusively heterosexual, and the other half were self-identified as exclusively homosexual or bisexual. The results supported all predictions substantially.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-206
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume144
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2004

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Adult Children
Fathers
Nuclear Family
Communication
Heterosexuality
Gestures
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Minorities

Keywords

  • Affection exchange theory
  • Fatherhood
  • Sexual orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Human Affection Exchange : VI. Further Tests of Reproductive Probability as a Predictor of Men's Affection With Their Adult Sons. / Floyd, Kory; Sargent, Jack E.; Di Corcia, Mark.

In: Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 144, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 191-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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