How young children spend their time

television and other activities.

A. C. Huston, J. C. Wright, J. Marquis, S. B. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Time-use diaries were collected over a 3-year period for 2 cohorts of 2- and 4-year-old children. TV viewing declined with age. Time spent in reading and educational activities increased with age on weekdays but declined on weekends. Time-use patterns were sex-stereotyped, and sex differences increased with age. As individuals' time in educational activities, social interaction, and video games increased, their time watching entertainment TV declined, but time spent playing covaried positively with entertainment TV. Educational TV viewing was not related to time spent in non-TV activities. Maternal education and home environment quality predicted frequent viewing of educational TV programs and infrequent viewing of entertainment TV. The results do not support a simple displacement hypothesis; the relations of TV viewing to other activities depend on the program content, the nature of the competing activity, and the environmental context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-925
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Television
television
entertainment
educational activities
Education
Video Games
weekend
computer game
Interpersonal Relations
time
Sex Characteristics
Reading
Mothers
interaction
education

Cite this

Huston, A. C., Wright, J. C., Marquis, J., & Green, S. B. (1999). How young children spend their time: television and other activities. Developmental Psychology, 35(4), 912-925.

How young children spend their time : television and other activities. / Huston, A. C.; Wright, J. C.; Marquis, J.; Green, S. B.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 4, 1999, p. 912-925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huston, AC, Wright, JC, Marquis, J & Green, SB 1999, 'How young children spend their time: television and other activities.', Developmental Psychology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 912-925.
Huston AC, Wright JC, Marquis J, Green SB. How young children spend their time: television and other activities. Developmental Psychology. 1999;35(4):912-925.
Huston, A. C. ; Wright, J. C. ; Marquis, J. ; Green, S. B. / How young children spend their time : television and other activities. In: Developmental Psychology. 1999 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 912-925.
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