How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions

Carolyn H. van der Bogert, Jaclyn D. Clark, Harald Hiesinger, Maria E. Banks, Thomas R. Watters, Mark Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain – an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-242
Number of pages18
JournalIcarus
Volume306
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2018

Fingerprint

escarpments
resetting
frequency distribution
craters
crater
tectonics
degradation
age determination
landforms
graben
ground motion
landform
Moon
chronology
moon
distribution
indication
slip
life (durability)
evaluation

Keywords

  • Absolute model ages
  • Crater size-frequency distributions
  • Lobate scarp
  • Moon
  • Seismic shaking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

van der Bogert, C. H., Clark, J. D., Hiesinger, H., Banks, M. E., Watters, T. R., & Robinson, M. (2018). How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions. Icarus, 306, 225-242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2018.01.019

How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions. / van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hiesinger, Harald; Banks, Maria E.; Watters, Thomas R.; Robinson, Mark.

In: Icarus, Vol. 306, 15.05.2018, p. 225-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van der Bogert, Carolyn H. ; Clark, Jaclyn D. ; Hiesinger, Harald ; Banks, Maria E. ; Watters, Thomas R. ; Robinson, Mark. / How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions. In: Icarus. 2018 ; Vol. 306. pp. 225-242.
@article{bbed22f7d04d494d9c85c2e205932807,
title = "How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions",
abstract = "Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain – an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.",
keywords = "Absolute model ages, Crater size-frequency distributions, Lobate scarp, Moon, Seismic shaking",
author = "{van der Bogert}, {Carolyn H.} and Clark, {Jaclyn D.} and Harald Hiesinger and Banks, {Maria E.} and Watters, {Thomas R.} and Mark Robinson",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.icarus.2018.01.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "306",
pages = "225--242",
journal = "Icarus",
issn = "0019-1035",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions

AU - van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

AU - Clark, Jaclyn D.

AU - Hiesinger, Harald

AU - Banks, Maria E.

AU - Watters, Thomas R.

AU - Robinson, Mark

PY - 2018/5/15

Y1 - 2018/5/15

N2 - Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain – an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.

AB - Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain – an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.

KW - Absolute model ages

KW - Crater size-frequency distributions

KW - Lobate scarp

KW - Moon

KW - Seismic shaking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044871548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044871548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.icarus.2018.01.019

DO - 10.1016/j.icarus.2018.01.019

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85044871548

VL - 306

SP - 225

EP - 242

JO - Icarus

JF - Icarus

SN - 0019-1035

ER -