How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults?

C. Tudor-Locke, L. Burkett, J. P. Reis, Barbara Ainsworth, C. A. Macera, D. K. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

276 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The study purpose was to establish the number (and type) of days needed to estimate mean pedometer-determined steps/day in a field setting. Methods. Seven days of data were collected from 90 participants (33 males, age = 49.1 ± 16.2 years, BMI = 27.2 ± 4.1 kg/m 2; 57 females, age = 44.8 ± 16.9 years, BMI = 27.0 ± 5.9 kg/m 2). Mean steps/day were computed for all 7 days (the criterion), each single day, and combinations of days. Analyses included repeated measures ANOVA, intra-class correlations (ICC), and regression. Results. There was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between days. The difference was limited to Sunday and accounted for 5% of the variance. ICC analyses indicated a minimum of 3 days is necessary to achieve a reliability of 0.80. The adjusted R 2 was 0.79 for a single day (specifically Wednesday), 0.89 for 2 days (Wednesday, Thursday), and 0.94 for 3 days (Wednesday, Thursday, Friday). Sunday was the last day to enter the model. Conclusions. Although there is a statistical difference between days, there is little practical difference, and the primary distinction appears limited to Sunday. Although a single day of collection is not acceptable, any 3 days can provide a sufficient estimate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-298
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Outcome assessment
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Tudor-Locke, C., Burkett, L., Reis, J. P., Ainsworth, B., Macera, C. A., & Wilson, D. K. (2005). How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults? Preventive Medicine, 40(3), 293-298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.06.003

How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults? / Tudor-Locke, C.; Burkett, L.; Reis, J. P.; Ainsworth, Barbara; Macera, C. A.; Wilson, D. K.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 293-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tudor-Locke, C, Burkett, L, Reis, JP, Ainsworth, B, Macera, CA & Wilson, DK 2005, 'How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults?', Preventive Medicine, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 293-298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.06.003
Tudor-Locke C, Burkett L, Reis JP, Ainsworth B, Macera CA, Wilson DK. How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults? Preventive Medicine. 2005 Mar;40(3):293-298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.06.003
Tudor-Locke, C. ; Burkett, L. ; Reis, J. P. ; Ainsworth, Barbara ; Macera, C. A. ; Wilson, D. K. / How many days of pedometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity in adults?. In: Preventive Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 293-298.
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