How large is the role of emotion in judgments of moral dilemmas?

Zachary Horne, Derek Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Moral dilemmas often pose dramatic and gut-wrenching emotional choices. It is now widely accepted that emotions are not simply experienced alongside people's judgments about moral dilemmas, but that our affective processes play a central role in determining those judgments. However, much of the evidence purporting to demonstrate the connection between people's emotional responses and their judgments about moral dilemmas has recently been called into question. In the present studies, we reexamined the role of emotion in people's judgments about moral dilemmas using a validated self-report measure of emotion. We measured participants' specific emotional responses to moral dilemmas and, although we found that moral dilemmas evoked strong emotional responses, we found that these responses were only weakly correlated with participants' moral judgments. We argue that the purportedly strong connection between emotion and judgments of moral dilemmas may have been overestimated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0154780
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

emotions
Emotions
digestive system
Self Report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

How large is the role of emotion in judgments of moral dilemmas? / Horne, Zachary; Powell, Derek.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0154780, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{33642f7d55cd4b4f98dd327e3e2a8ad9,
title = "How large is the role of emotion in judgments of moral dilemmas?",
abstract = "Moral dilemmas often pose dramatic and gut-wrenching emotional choices. It is now widely accepted that emotions are not simply experienced alongside people's judgments about moral dilemmas, but that our affective processes play a central role in determining those judgments. However, much of the evidence purporting to demonstrate the connection between people's emotional responses and their judgments about moral dilemmas has recently been called into question. In the present studies, we reexamined the role of emotion in people's judgments about moral dilemmas using a validated self-report measure of emotion. We measured participants' specific emotional responses to moral dilemmas and, although we found that moral dilemmas evoked strong emotional responses, we found that these responses were only weakly correlated with participants' moral judgments. We argue that the purportedly strong connection between emotion and judgments of moral dilemmas may have been overestimated.",
author = "Zachary Horne and Derek Powell",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0154780",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How large is the role of emotion in judgments of moral dilemmas?

AU - Horne, Zachary

AU - Powell, Derek

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Moral dilemmas often pose dramatic and gut-wrenching emotional choices. It is now widely accepted that emotions are not simply experienced alongside people's judgments about moral dilemmas, but that our affective processes play a central role in determining those judgments. However, much of the evidence purporting to demonstrate the connection between people's emotional responses and their judgments about moral dilemmas has recently been called into question. In the present studies, we reexamined the role of emotion in people's judgments about moral dilemmas using a validated self-report measure of emotion. We measured participants' specific emotional responses to moral dilemmas and, although we found that moral dilemmas evoked strong emotional responses, we found that these responses were only weakly correlated with participants' moral judgments. We argue that the purportedly strong connection between emotion and judgments of moral dilemmas may have been overestimated.

AB - Moral dilemmas often pose dramatic and gut-wrenching emotional choices. It is now widely accepted that emotions are not simply experienced alongside people's judgments about moral dilemmas, but that our affective processes play a central role in determining those judgments. However, much of the evidence purporting to demonstrate the connection between people's emotional responses and their judgments about moral dilemmas has recently been called into question. In the present studies, we reexamined the role of emotion in people's judgments about moral dilemmas using a validated self-report measure of emotion. We measured participants' specific emotional responses to moral dilemmas and, although we found that moral dilemmas evoked strong emotional responses, we found that these responses were only weakly correlated with participants' moral judgments. We argue that the purportedly strong connection between emotion and judgments of moral dilemmas may have been overestimated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978153323&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978153323&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0154780

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0154780

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e0154780

ER -