How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework?

Carla van de Sande, May Boggess, Catherine Hart-Weber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Homework is a daily activity for at least twelve years of most students' school experience, and every assignment requires the time, energy, and emotional engagement of all those involved. Traditionally, students seeking homework help could refer to their class notes and textbooks, or ask their friends, tutors, and, perhaps, as last resort, their parents. Now, however, the Internet has greatly extended the set of resources to which students have ready access. By going online, students can read tutorials, watch videos, and even seek personalized homework help from a large community of others in online forums. Students who are currently in high school have grown up with computers, mobile devices, and other technologies that make Internet access a convenience, if not an expectation. Given their exposure to technology, together with an expanded pool of readily available resources, how do students today seek help on their homework? In particular, what resources (digital versus non-digital) do they favor and to what extent? This paper documents how a large population of USA high school students seeks help on their mathematics assignments. Comparisons between students in remedial, core, and advanced courses are also made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013
Pages33-40
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2013
EventInternational Conference e-Learning 2013, Part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2013, MCCSIS 2013 - , Czech Republic
Duration: Jul 23 2013Jul 26 2013

Other

OtherInternational Conference e-Learning 2013, Part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2013, MCCSIS 2013
CountryCzech Republic
Period7/23/137/26/13

Fingerprint

Mathematics
Students
Internet
Technology
Textbooks
Parents
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Digital resources
  • Help seeking
  • Homework
  • Mathematics
  • Net Generation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Respiratory Care

Cite this

van de Sande, C., Boggess, M., & Hart-Weber, C. (2013). How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework? In Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013 (pp. 33-40)

How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework? / van de Sande, Carla; Boggess, May; Hart-Weber, Catherine.

Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013. 2013. p. 33-40.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

van de Sande, C, Boggess, M & Hart-Weber, C 2013, How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework? in Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013. pp. 33-40, International Conference e-Learning 2013, Part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2013, MCCSIS 2013, Czech Republic, 7/23/13.
van de Sande C, Boggess M, Hart-Weber C. How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework? In Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013. 2013. p. 33-40
van de Sande, Carla ; Boggess, May ; Hart-Weber, Catherine. / How does the 'digital generation' get help on their mathematics homework?. Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2013. 2013. pp. 33-40
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