How copying affects the amount, evenness and persistence of cultural knowledge: Insights from the social learning strategies tournament

L. Rendell, R. Boyd, M. Enquist, M. W. Feldman, L. Fogarty, K. N. Laland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Darwinian processes should favour those individuals that deploy the most effective strategies for acquiring information about their environment. We organized a computer-based tournament to investigate which learning strategies would perform well in a changing environment. The most successful strategies relied almost exclusively on social learning (here, learning a behaviour performed by another individual) rather than asocial learning, even when environments were changing rapidly; moreover, successful strategies focused learning effort on periods of environmental change. Here, we use data from tournament simulations to examine how these strategies might affect cultural evolution, as reflected in the amount of culture (i.e. number of cultural traits) in the population, the distribution of cultural traits across individuals, and their persistence through time. We found that high levels of social learning are associated with a larger amount of more persistent knowledge, but a smaller amount of less persistent expressed behaviour, as well as more uneven distributions of behaviour, as individuals concentrated on exploiting a smaller subset of behaviour patterns. Increased rates of environmental change generated increases in the amount and evenness of behaviour. These observations suggest that copying confers on cultural populations an adaptive plasticity, allowing them to respond to changing environments rapidly by drawing on a wider knowledge base.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1118-1128
Number of pages11
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume366
Issue number1567
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cultural evolution
  • Simulation modelling
  • Social learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How copying affects the amount, evenness and persistence of cultural knowledge: Insights from the social learning strategies tournament'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this