How are C-suite executives different? A comparative empirical study of the survival of American chief information officers

Gregory S. Dawson, Man Wai Ho, Robert J. Kauffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research employs non-parametric, semi-parametric, and parametric survival analysis methods to explore theory-based aspects of CIO and other C-suite executives' job tenures. We analyze a large data set of C-suite executives, including 400 CIOs, drawn from the public and private sectors, including federal, state, county and city agencies, and Fortune 500 firms. The data span 1994 to 2009, and include the job start and finish dates of the different executives, as well as relevant variables for the individual, organizational, market and technological environments that permit us to assess the patterns of their survivability. We report evidence to suggest that CIOs have more in common regarding survivability with other C-suite executives than is widely believed. We also report differences based on individual characteristics (gender, education, income, time in position), organization type (government versus Fortune 500), organization size, and reactions to changes in the stock market. In addition, CIO job tenures have grown longer from the early 1990s to the present day. Though there are few differences due to CIO gender, the relatively rare presence of female executives is associated with shorter job tenures for male executives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-105
Number of pages18
JournalDecision Support Systems
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Organizations
Private Sector
Public Sector
Survival Analysis
Education
Research
Fortune
Chief information officer
Empirical study
Empirical Study
Datasets
Financial markets
Job tenure
Tenure
Survivability

Keywords

  • CIO
  • Job tenure
  • Kaplan-Meier estimator
  • Non-parametric estimation
  • Parametric survival model
  • Proportional hazards model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Information Systems
  • Information Systems and Management
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

How are C-suite executives different? A comparative empirical study of the survival of American chief information officers. / Dawson, Gregory S.; Ho, Man Wai; Kauffman, Robert J.

In: Decision Support Systems, Vol. 74, 01.06.2015, p. 88-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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