Household chaos and children's cognitive and socio-emotional development in early childhood: Does childcare play a buffering role?

The Family Life Project Key Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that household chaos is associated with less optimal child outcomes. Yet, there is an increasing indication that children's experiences in childcare may buffer them against the detrimental effects of such environments. Our study aims were to test: (1) whether children's experiences in childcare mitigated relations between household chaos and children's cognitive and social development, and (2) whether these (conditional) chaos effects were mediated by links between chaos and executive functioning. Using data from The Family Life Project (n = 1235)-a population-based sample of families from low-income, rural contexts-our findings indicated that household disorganization in early childhood was predictive of worse cognitive and social outcomes at approximately age five. However, these relations were substantially attenuated for children attending greater childcare hours. Subsequent models indicated that the conditional associations between household disorganization and less optimal outcomes at age five were mediated by conditional links between disorganization and less optimal executive functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-127
Number of pages13
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume34
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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emotional development
chaos
childhood
cognitive development
social development
indication
Buffers
experience
low income
Population
evidence

Keywords

  • Childcare
  • Cognitive development
  • Executive function
  • Household chaos
  • Social development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Household chaos and children's cognitive and socio-emotional development in early childhood : Does childcare play a buffering role? / The Family Life Project Key Investigators.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 34, 01.03.2016, p. 115-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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