Home observation for measurement of the environment: a validation study of screening efficiency

Robert Bradley, B. M. Caldwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Home environments of 91 6-month-old infants were assessed with the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory. Multiple discriminant functions composed of the six subscale scores from the HOME Inventory were used to predict whether a child would be low IQ (below 70), low average (70 to 89), or average to superior (90 and above) at age 3 years. The mean vector of HOME Inventory subscales for the three IQ groups was significantly different (p<0.01). Significant univariate effects were observed for three HOME Inventory subscales: organization of the physical and temporal environment, provision of appropriate play material, and maternal involvement with child. The discriminant function of HOME Inventory subscale scores correctly predicted 71 percents of all children who scored below 70 IQ. Results attest to the usefulness of the HOME Inventory in a comprehensive program of screening for developmental delay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-420
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Mental Deficiency
Volume81
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

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Validation Studies
Observation
Equipment and Supplies
Screening
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Home observation for measurement of the environment : a validation study of screening efficiency. / Bradley, Robert; Caldwell, B. M.

In: American Journal of Mental Deficiency, Vol. 81, No. 5, 1977, p. 417-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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