Higher weight gain by Kuroiler chickens than indigenous chickens raised under scavenging conditions by rural households in Uganda

Jagdev Sharma, Jie Xie, May Boggess, Esau Galukande, Daniel Semambo, Sylvia Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A field trial was conducted in which Kuroiler chickens (KC) and indigenous chickens (IC) were vaccinated against common poultry diseases and held in confinement for 11 weeks and then raised simultaneously by village households in Uganda under identical scavenging conditions. The trial villages were located in five districts in geographically diverse parts of the country. The KC thrived in all trial locations of the country with a 7-month survival rate of 85% compared 83% for IC (p>0.05). At intervals between 11 and 43 weeks of age, total body weights were recorded on 343 male KC, 169 male IC, 285 female KC and 339 female IC. The results showed that KC gained body weight more rapidly and to a higher level than IC (P <0.05). At 25 weeks of age, the average body weight of male KC was 2.6 Kg compared to 1.6 Kg for IC; at 43 weeks, the respective body weights were 3.0 Kg and 2.2 Kg. Significantly (P <0.05) faster weight gain by KC compared to that by IC under scavenging conditions in rural settings indicates that returns from village poultry in Uganda may be improved by the introduction of KC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLivestock Research for Rural Development
Volume27
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • African poultry
  • Backyard poultry
  • Backyard poultry production
  • Chicken flocks
  • Cross-bred chickens
  • Egg production
  • Family income
  • Family nutrition
  • Hybrid chickens
  • Improved village poultry
  • Indigenous chickens
  • Poultry meat production
  • Value chain
  • Village chicken distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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