Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates

Gro Amdam, K. Norberg, S. W. Omholt, P. Kryger, A. P. Lourenço, M. M G Bitondi, Z. L P Simões

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The honey bee originated in tropical Africa and later dispersed to northern Europe. It has been suggested that a higher hemolymph storage capacity for the glycolipoprotein vitellogenin evolved in temperate regions, and that the trait constitutes an adaptation to a strongly seasonal environment. We have investigated whether the relative vitellogenin levels of European and African honey bees are in accordance with this hypothesis. Our data indicate that European workers have a higher set-point concentration for vitellogenin compared to their African origin. Considered together with available life history information and physiological data, the results lend support to the view that "winter bees", a long-lived honey bee worker caste that survives winter in temperate regions, evolved through an increase in the worker bees' capacity for vitellogenin accumulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-319
Number of pages4
JournalInsectes Sociaux
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

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worker honey bees
vitellogenin
honey
temperate zones
bee
honey bees
worker bees
worker caste
winter
Northern European region
hemolymph
Apoidea
life history
temperate climate

Keywords

  • Climatic regions
  • Evolution
  • Honey bee workers
  • Longevity
  • Vitellogenin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Amdam, G., Norberg, K., Omholt, S. W., Kryger, P., Lourenço, A. P., Bitondi, M. M. G., & Simões, Z. L. P. (2005). Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates. Insectes Sociaux, 52(4), 316-319. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00040-005-0812-2

Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates. / Amdam, Gro; Norberg, K.; Omholt, S. W.; Kryger, P.; Lourenço, A. P.; Bitondi, M. M G; Simões, Z. L P.

In: Insectes Sociaux, Vol. 52, No. 4, 11.2005, p. 316-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amdam, G, Norberg, K, Omholt, SW, Kryger, P, Lourenço, AP, Bitondi, MMG & Simões, ZLP 2005, 'Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates', Insectes Sociaux, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 316-319. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00040-005-0812-2
Amdam, Gro ; Norberg, K. ; Omholt, S. W. ; Kryger, P. ; Lourenço, A. P. ; Bitondi, M. M G ; Simões, Z. L P. / Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates. In: Insectes Sociaux. 2005 ; Vol. 52, No. 4. pp. 316-319.
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