Higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV in a clinical neuropsychological sample

Doug Bodin, Dustin Pardini, Thomas G. Burns, Abigail B. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted examining the higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV scores for 344 children who participated in neuropsychological evaluations at a large children's hospital. The WISC-IV factor structure mirrored that of the standardization sample. The second order general intelligence factor (g) accounted for the largest proportion of variance in the first-order latent factors and in the individual subtests, especially for the working memory index. The first-order processing speed factor exhibited the most unique variance beyond the influence of g. The results suggest that clinicians should not ignore the contribution of g when interpreting the first-order factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-424
Number of pages8
JournalChild Neuropsychology
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Intelligence
Short-Term Memory
Statistical Factor Analysis

Keywords

  • Child assessment
  • Factor analysis
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Pediatric neuropsychology
  • WISC-IV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV in a clinical neuropsychological sample. / Bodin, Doug; Pardini, Dustin; Burns, Thomas G.; Stevens, Abigail B.

In: Child Neuropsychology, Vol. 15, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 417-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bodin, Doug ; Pardini, Dustin ; Burns, Thomas G. ; Stevens, Abigail B. / Higher order factor structure of the WISC-IV in a clinical neuropsychological sample. In: Child Neuropsychology. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 417-424.
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