High-stakes testing and the history of graduation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An historical perspective on high-stakes testing suggests that tests required for high school graduation will have mixed results for the putative value of high school diplomas: (1) graduation requirements are likely to have indirect as well as direct effects on the likelihood of graduating; (2) the proliferation of different exit documents may dilute efforts to improve the education of all students; and (3) graduation requirements remain unlikely to disentangle the general cultural confusion in the U.S. about the purpose of secondary education and a high school diploma, especially confusion about whether the educational, exchange, or other value of a diploma is most important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEducation Policy Analysis Archives
Volume11
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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school graduation
history
secondary education
school
proliferation
Values
education
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

High-stakes testing and the history of graduation. / Dorn, Sherman.

In: Education Policy Analysis Archives, Vol. 11, 01.01.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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