Hidden in plain sight: Jewish children and the holocaust in Fred Zinnemann's the Search (1948)

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The Search, Fred Zinnemann’s 1948 film about displaced and orphaned children, has long sat on the periphery of Holocaust film. Although it has an important Jewish character—a boy who survived the war by hiding his identity—the heart of the film centers on a non-Jewish child. However, the film’s explicitly Jewish material is only the most visible aspect of its interest in Jewish children and the Holocaust. To a large extent, the film’s efforts to address the Holocaust are submerged—or, more accurately, became submerged over the course of its production. Drawing on a rich body of sources, this essay revisits The Search’s treatment of the Holocaust, examining how the film openly addresses the murder of European Jewry and how it elides and suppresses this history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-143
Number of pages28
JournalFilm History: An International Journal
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Holocaust
Murder
Visible
Boys
History

Keywords

  • Fred Zinnemann
  • Holocaust film
  • Jewish children
  • Switzerland
  • The Search

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • History

Cite this

Hidden in plain sight : Jewish children and the holocaust in Fred Zinnemann's the Search (1948). / Holian, Anna.

In: Film History: An International Journal, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 116-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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