Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays

Barbara Smith, Sorachon Yoriya, Laura Grissom, Craig A. Grimes, Ketul C. Popat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hemocompatibility is a key consideration for the long-term success of blood contacting biomaterials; hence, there is a critical need to understand the physiological response elicited from blood/nano-biomaterial interactions. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets, and clotting kinetics of whole blood on titania nanotube arrays. Previous studies have demonstrated improved mesenchymal stem cell functionality, osteoblast phenotypic behavior, localized drug delivery, and the production of endothelial cell ECM on titania nanotube arrays. Furthermore, these titania nanotube arrays have elicited minimal levels of monocyte activation and cytokine secretion, thus exhibiting a very low degree of immunogenicity. Titania nanotube arrays were fabricated using anodization technique and the surface morphology was examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phases were identified using glancing angled X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Nanoindentation and scratch tests were used to characterize the mechanical properties of titania nanotube arrays. The adsorption of key blood proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin-g) was evaluated using a micro-BCA assay and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesion and activation of platelets was investigated using live-cell staining, MTT assay, and SEM. Whole blood clotting kinetics was evaluated by measuring the free hemoglobin concentration, and SEM was used to visualize the clot formation. Our results indicate increased blood serum protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and activation, and whole blood clotting kinetics on titania nanotube arrays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-360
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume95 A
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nanotubes
Blood
Titanium
Platelets
Chemical activation
Blood Proteins
Adhesion
Biocompatible Materials
Adsorption
Scanning electron microscopy
Kinetics
Proteins
Biomaterials
Assays
Military electronic countermeasures
Osteoblasts
Endothelial cells
Nanoindentation
titanium dioxide
Stem cells

Keywords

  • hemocompatibility
  • platelet adhesion and activation
  • titania nanotube arrays
  • whole blood clotting kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays. / Smith, Barbara; Yoriya, Sorachon; Grissom, Laura; Grimes, Craig A.; Popat, Ketul C.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 95 A, No. 2, 11.2010, p. 350-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, B, Yoriya, S, Grissom, L, Grimes, CA & Popat, KC 2010, 'Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays', Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, vol. 95 A, no. 2, pp. 350-360. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32853
Smith, Barbara ; Yoriya, Sorachon ; Grissom, Laura ; Grimes, Craig A. ; Popat, Ketul C. / Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2010 ; Vol. 95 A, No. 2. pp. 350-360.
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