Hemispheric specialization for movement control produces dissociable differences in online corrections after stroke

Sydney Schaefer, Pratik K. Mutha, Kathleen Y. Haaland, Robert L. Sainburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examine whether corrections made during an ongoing movement are differentially affected by left hemisphere damage (LHD) and right hemisphere damage (RHD). Our hypothesis of motor lateralization proposes that control mechanisms specialized to the right hemisphere rely largely on online processes, while the left hemisphere primarily utilizes predictive mechanisms to specify optimal coordination patterns. We therefore predict that RHD, but not LHD, should impair online correction when task goals are unexpectedly changed. Fourteen stroke subjects (7 LHD, 7 RHD) and 14 healthy controls reached to 1 of the 3 targets that unexpectedly "jumped" during movement onset. RHD subjects showed a considerable delay in initiating the corrective response relative to controls and LHD subjects. However, both stroke groups made large final position errors on the target jump trials. Position deficits following LHD were associated with poor intersegmental coordination, while RHD subjects had difficulty terminating their movements appropriately. These findings confirm that RHD, but not LHD, produces a deficit in the timing of online corrections and also indicate that both stroke groups show position deficits that are related to the specialization of their damaged hemisphere. Further research is needed to identify specific neural circuits within each hemisphere critical for these processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1407-1419
Number of pages13
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebral Dominance
Stroke
Research

Keywords

  • lateralization
  • motor control
  • reaching
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Hemispheric specialization for movement control produces dissociable differences in online corrections after stroke. / Schaefer, Sydney; Mutha, Pratik K.; Haaland, Kathleen Y.; Sainburg, Robert L.

In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 22, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 1407-1419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schaefer, Sydney ; Mutha, Pratik K. ; Haaland, Kathleen Y. ; Sainburg, Robert L. / Hemispheric specialization for movement control produces dissociable differences in online corrections after stroke. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 1407-1419.
@article{89ca5f6dc68f44cabb6cd88ebd4f30fd,
title = "Hemispheric specialization for movement control produces dissociable differences in online corrections after stroke",
abstract = "In this study, we examine whether corrections made during an ongoing movement are differentially affected by left hemisphere damage (LHD) and right hemisphere damage (RHD). Our hypothesis of motor lateralization proposes that control mechanisms specialized to the right hemisphere rely largely on online processes, while the left hemisphere primarily utilizes predictive mechanisms to specify optimal coordination patterns. We therefore predict that RHD, but not LHD, should impair online correction when task goals are unexpectedly changed. Fourteen stroke subjects (7 LHD, 7 RHD) and 14 healthy controls reached to 1 of the 3 targets that unexpectedly {"}jumped{"} during movement onset. RHD subjects showed a considerable delay in initiating the corrective response relative to controls and LHD subjects. However, both stroke groups made large final position errors on the target jump trials. Position deficits following LHD were associated with poor intersegmental coordination, while RHD subjects had difficulty terminating their movements appropriately. These findings confirm that RHD, but not LHD, produces a deficit in the timing of online corrections and also indicate that both stroke groups show position deficits that are related to the specialization of their damaged hemisphere. Further research is needed to identify specific neural circuits within each hemisphere critical for these processes.",
keywords = "lateralization, motor control, reaching, stroke",
author = "Sydney Schaefer and Mutha, {Pratik K.} and Haaland, {Kathleen Y.} and Sainburg, {Robert L.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1093/cercor/bhr237",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "1407--1419",
journal = "Cerebral Cortex",
issn = "1047-3211",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hemispheric specialization for movement control produces dissociable differences in online corrections after stroke

AU - Schaefer, Sydney

AU - Mutha, Pratik K.

AU - Haaland, Kathleen Y.

AU - Sainburg, Robert L.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - In this study, we examine whether corrections made during an ongoing movement are differentially affected by left hemisphere damage (LHD) and right hemisphere damage (RHD). Our hypothesis of motor lateralization proposes that control mechanisms specialized to the right hemisphere rely largely on online processes, while the left hemisphere primarily utilizes predictive mechanisms to specify optimal coordination patterns. We therefore predict that RHD, but not LHD, should impair online correction when task goals are unexpectedly changed. Fourteen stroke subjects (7 LHD, 7 RHD) and 14 healthy controls reached to 1 of the 3 targets that unexpectedly "jumped" during movement onset. RHD subjects showed a considerable delay in initiating the corrective response relative to controls and LHD subjects. However, both stroke groups made large final position errors on the target jump trials. Position deficits following LHD were associated with poor intersegmental coordination, while RHD subjects had difficulty terminating their movements appropriately. These findings confirm that RHD, but not LHD, produces a deficit in the timing of online corrections and also indicate that both stroke groups show position deficits that are related to the specialization of their damaged hemisphere. Further research is needed to identify specific neural circuits within each hemisphere critical for these processes.

AB - In this study, we examine whether corrections made during an ongoing movement are differentially affected by left hemisphere damage (LHD) and right hemisphere damage (RHD). Our hypothesis of motor lateralization proposes that control mechanisms specialized to the right hemisphere rely largely on online processes, while the left hemisphere primarily utilizes predictive mechanisms to specify optimal coordination patterns. We therefore predict that RHD, but not LHD, should impair online correction when task goals are unexpectedly changed. Fourteen stroke subjects (7 LHD, 7 RHD) and 14 healthy controls reached to 1 of the 3 targets that unexpectedly "jumped" during movement onset. RHD subjects showed a considerable delay in initiating the corrective response relative to controls and LHD subjects. However, both stroke groups made large final position errors on the target jump trials. Position deficits following LHD were associated with poor intersegmental coordination, while RHD subjects had difficulty terminating their movements appropriately. These findings confirm that RHD, but not LHD, produces a deficit in the timing of online corrections and also indicate that both stroke groups show position deficits that are related to the specialization of their damaged hemisphere. Further research is needed to identify specific neural circuits within each hemisphere critical for these processes.

KW - lateralization

KW - motor control

KW - reaching

KW - stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861565985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861565985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/cercor/bhr237

DO - 10.1093/cercor/bhr237

M3 - Article

C2 - 21878488

AN - SCOPUS:84861565985

VL - 22

SP - 1407

EP - 1419

JO - Cerebral Cortex

JF - Cerebral Cortex

SN - 1047-3211

IS - 6

ER -