Heat Death Associations with the built environment, social vulnerability and their interactions with rising temperature

David P. Eisenman, Holly Wilhalme, Chi Hong Tseng, Mikhail Chester, Paul English, Stephanie Pincetl, Andrew Fraser, Sitaram Vangala, Satvinder K. Dhaliwal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an extreme heat event, people can go to air-conditioned public facilities if residential air-conditioning is not available. Residences that heat slowly may also mitigate health effects, particularly in neighborhoods with social vulnerability. We explored the contributions of social vulnerability and these infrastructures to heat mortality in Maricopa County and whether these relationships are sensitive to temperature. Using Poisson regression modeling with heat-related mortality as the outcome, we assessed the interaction of increasing temperature with social vulnerability, access to publicly available air conditioned space, home air conditioning and the thermal properties of residences. As temperatures increase, mortality from heat-related illness increases less in census tracts with more publicly accessible cooled spaces. Mortality from all internal causes of death did not have this association. Building thermal protection was not associated with mortality. Social vulnerability was still associated with mortality after adjusting for the infrastructure variables. To reduce heat-related mortality, the use of public cooled spaces might be expanded to target the most vulnerable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-99
Number of pages11
JournalHealth and Place
Volume41
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Environment
heat
vulnerability
mortality
Hot Temperature
death
Temperature
Mortality
interaction
air
Air Conditioning
temperature
air conditioning
conditioning
Extreme Heat
Air
infrastructure
Public Facilities
public facility
cause of death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Heat Death Associations with the built environment, social vulnerability and their interactions with rising temperature. / Eisenman, David P.; Wilhalme, Holly; Tseng, Chi Hong; Chester, Mikhail; English, Paul; Pincetl, Stephanie; Fraser, Andrew; Vangala, Sitaram; Dhaliwal, Satvinder K.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 41, 01.09.2016, p. 89-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eisenman, DP, Wilhalme, H, Tseng, CH, Chester, M, English, P, Pincetl, S, Fraser, A, Vangala, S & Dhaliwal, SK 2016, 'Heat Death Associations with the built environment, social vulnerability and their interactions with rising temperature', Health and Place, vol. 41, pp. 89-99. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.08.007
Eisenman, David P. ; Wilhalme, Holly ; Tseng, Chi Hong ; Chester, Mikhail ; English, Paul ; Pincetl, Stephanie ; Fraser, Andrew ; Vangala, Sitaram ; Dhaliwal, Satvinder K. / Heat Death Associations with the built environment, social vulnerability and their interactions with rising temperature. In: Health and Place. 2016 ; Vol. 41. pp. 89-99.
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