Hearing impairment in F-111 maintenance workers: The study of health outcomes in aircraft maintenance personnel (SHOAMP) general health and medical study

Maya Guest, May Boggess, John Attia, Catherine D'Este, Anthony Brown, Richard Gibson, Meredith Tavener, Ian Gardner, Warren Harrex, Keith Horsley, James Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We sought to examine hearing loss in a group from the Royal Australian Air Force who undertook fuel tank maintenance on F-111 aircraft, with exposure to formulations containing ototoxins, relative to two different comparison groups. Methods: Using pure-tone audiometry, hearing thresholds were assessed in 614 exposed personnel, 513 technical-trade comparisons (different base, same job), and 403 non-technical comparisons (same base, different job). We calculated percentage loss of hearing (PLH) and used regression models to examine whether there was an association between PLH and F-111 fuel tank maintenance, adjusting for possible confounders. In addition, the difference between the observed hearing thresholds and the expected thresholds based on an otologically normal population (ISO-7029-2003) was determined. Results: The PLH ranged from nil to 96 (median 1.5, quartiles 0.3, 5.5). A logistic regression model showed no statistically significant difference in PLH among the three exposure groups (exposed vs. non-technical controls 1.1: 95% CI 0.7, 2.0 and exposed vs. technical OR 0.9: 95% CI 0.6, 1.3). The model also highlighted a number of other risk factors for PLH including age, tinnitus, smoking, depression, and use of depression medications. However, at all eight frequencies measured, all populations had lower than expected hearing thresholds based on published ISO-7029 medians. Conclusions: Although there was no difference in PLH between the three exposure groups, the study did reveal a high degree of hearing loss between the 3 groups and a normal population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1159-1169
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aircraft
Hearing Loss
Health Personnel
Maintenance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health
Hearing
Logistic Models
Depression
Population
Pure-Tone Audiometry
Tinnitus
Smoking
Air

Keywords

  • Aircraft
  • Depressive disorders
  • Hearing loss
  • Maintenance
  • Military service
  • Noise-induced hearing loss
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hearing impairment in F-111 maintenance workers : The study of health outcomes in aircraft maintenance personnel (SHOAMP) general health and medical study. / Guest, Maya; Boggess, May; Attia, John; D'Este, Catherine; Brown, Anthony; Gibson, Richard; Tavener, Meredith; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren; Horsley, Keith; Ross, James.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 1159-1169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guest, Maya ; Boggess, May ; Attia, John ; D'Este, Catherine ; Brown, Anthony ; Gibson, Richard ; Tavener, Meredith ; Gardner, Ian ; Harrex, Warren ; Horsley, Keith ; Ross, James. / Hearing impairment in F-111 maintenance workers : The study of health outcomes in aircraft maintenance personnel (SHOAMP) general health and medical study. In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 1159-1169.
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