Health status of preterm low-birth-weight infants: Comparisons of maternal reports

S. H. Scholle, L. Whiteside, K. Kelleher, Robert Bradley, P. Casey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Developers of measures of child health status have documented acceptable reliability and some validity, but less attention has been paid to the concurrent and predictive validity of these measures. Methods: We examined the concurrent and predictive validity of the RAND General Health Rating Index, the Stein-Jessop Functional Status II-R, and the mother's global assessment of her child's health on a 5-point scale, in a sample of preterm low-birth-weight children (n=608) who were followed up as controls in the Infant Health and Development Program. We compared maternal-reported measures assessed at 24 months with other measures of growth, morbidity, functioning, and health care utilization assessed concurrently and at 36 months in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: After controlling for other factors, the RAND General Health Rating Index and the Stein-Jessop Functional Status II-R were unrelated to the growth, utilization, or functioning measures. The RAND General Health Rating Index was significantly, but weakly, related to future morbidity. The mother's global perception of health was significantly related to outpatient utilization and behavior problems. Conclusions: Clinicians may find that maternal assessment of overall child health is a sensitive but nonspecific indicator of the mother's concern. For researchers, none of these measures seems likely to serve as a proxy for health care utilization or morbidity in studies of other phenomena, or as an indicator of detailed health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1351-1357
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume149
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Birth
Low Birth Weight Infant
Premature Infants
Health Status
Mothers
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Health
Morbidity
Proxy
Growth
Child Development
Reproducibility of Results
Outpatients
Multivariate Analysis
Research Personnel
Child Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Health status of preterm low-birth-weight infants : Comparisons of maternal reports. / Scholle, S. H.; Whiteside, L.; Kelleher, K.; Bradley, Robert; Casey, P.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 12, 1995, p. 1351-1357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scholle, SH, Whiteside, L, Kelleher, K, Bradley, R & Casey, P 1995, 'Health status of preterm low-birth-weight infants: Comparisons of maternal reports', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 149, no. 12, pp. 1351-1357.
Scholle, S. H. ; Whiteside, L. ; Kelleher, K. ; Bradley, Robert ; Casey, P. / Health status of preterm low-birth-weight infants : Comparisons of maternal reports. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 149, No. 12. pp. 1351-1357.
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