Health literacy demands of written health information materials: An assessment of cervical cancer prevention materials

Deborah Helitzer, Christine Hollis, Jane Cotner, Nancy Oestreicher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Health literacy requires reading and writing skills as well as knowledge of health topics and health systems. Materials written at high reading levels with ambiguous, technical or dense text, often place great comprehension demands on consumers with lower literacy skills. This study developed and used an instrument to analyze cervical cancer prevention materials for readability, comprehensibility, suitability, and message design. Methods: The Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) was amended for ease of use, inclusivity, and objectivity with the encouragement of the original developers. Other novel contributions were specifically related to "comprehensibility" (CAM). The resulting SAM + CAM was used to score 69 materials for content, literacy demand, numeric literacy, graphics, layout/typography and learning stimulation variables. Expert reviewers provided content validation. Inter-rater reliability was "substantial" (x = .77). Results: The mean reading level of materials was 11 lb grade. Most materials (68%) scored as "adequate" for comprehensibility, suitability, and message design; health education brochures scored better than other materials. Only one-fifth were ranked "superior"for ease of use and comprehensibility. (Conclusions: Most written materials bave a readability level that is too high and require improvement in ease of use and comprehensibility for the majority of readers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-78
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Control
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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