Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com

Elisabeth Dwyer, Sivaram Gogineni, Alexander Smits, Ronald Adrian, Stavros Tavoularis, Chris Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In an introductory fluid mechanics course, it is important for students to realize that the mathematical models they are deriving in class sometimes model the real world well and sometimes not so well. One way to demonstrate this is to have the students model a simple experiment and compare the results of the model to those of the experiment. This exercise teaches the importance of the model assumptions and the applicability of the model. It would be even more effective if the experiments were simple enough so that students could do them at home as a homework assignment, rather than restricting their experience to a "canned" two hour lab course. At eFluids.com, we are building a library of such experiments in an effort to build a community of educators that moves beyond the traditional mathematical exercises for homework. Here, we describe a number of these experiments and how they can be used in classes. We also present some methods of using the eFluids.com Gallery of Images in the classroom to give students the opportunity to see "Fluids in Action". Finally, we introduce the eFluids Olympiad section where faculty can post effective and "interesting" homework problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInnovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads
Pages433-437
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
Event2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004 - Anaheim, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 13 2004Nov 19 2004

Other

Other2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim, CA
Period11/13/0411/19/04

Fingerprint

Fluid mechanics
Students
Experiments
Mathematical models
Fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Dwyer, E., Gogineni, S., Smits, A., Adrian, R., Tavoularis, S., & Rogers, C. (2004). Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com. In Innovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads (pp. 433-437). [IMECE2004-61532]

Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com. / Dwyer, Elisabeth; Gogineni, Sivaram; Smits, Alexander; Adrian, Ronald; Tavoularis, Stavros; Rogers, Chris.

Innovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. 2004. p. 433-437 IMECE2004-61532.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dwyer, E, Gogineni, S, Smits, A, Adrian, R, Tavoularis, S & Rogers, C 2004, Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com. in Innovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads., IMECE2004-61532, pp. 433-437, 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004, Anaheim, CA, United States, 11/13/04.
Dwyer E, Gogineni S, Smits A, Adrian R, Tavoularis S, Rogers C. Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com. In Innovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. 2004. p. 433-437. IMECE2004-61532
Dwyer, Elisabeth ; Gogineni, Sivaram ; Smits, Alexander ; Adrian, Ronald ; Tavoularis, Stavros ; Rogers, Chris. / Hands-on experimentation in the fluid mechanics classroom as homework with eFluids.com. Innovations in Engineering Education 2004: Mechanical Engineering Education, Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Heads. 2004. pp. 433-437
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