Gun violence and police problem solving

A research note examining alternative data sources

George W. Burruss, Scott Decker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses gun seizure data from the gun lab of the St. Louis Police Department to examine a problemsolving approach to seizing illegal firearms. Further, it explores narrative data from the police reports to understand the context surrounding 113 firearms seizure. The most important findings are that most illegal firearms are seized by the police department in the course of routine patrol, and that many seemingly nonviolent technical law violations (e.g., the unlawful carrying, use, or concealment of a firearm) often occur under violent circumstances. Given the paucity of gun research, future studies should use multiple data sources to further explain the gun/crime relationship. These findings are discussed in the context of routine policing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-574
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Information Storage and Retrieval
Firearms
Police
Violence
police
seizure
violence
Research
offense
narrative
Seizures
Law
Crime

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Gun violence and police problem solving : A research note examining alternative data sources. / Burruss, George W.; Decker, Scott.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 30, No. 6, 11.2002, p. 567-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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