Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks

A. Loui, E. Tsalikaki, K. Maier, E. Walch, Y. Kamarianakis, M. Obladen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Growth of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants is used to monitor nutrition and intrauterine velocity is taken as the desired goal. Aim: We hypothesised that beside nutrition growth failure is caused by disease severity. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study of 45 VLBW infants undergoing intensive care, mechanical ventilation was used as proxy to disease severity. Nutritional intake, body weight, length, head circumference, and lower leg length (LLL) were measured during the first 5 weeks of life. Results: Birthweight and gestational age were lower in 22 ventilated than in 23 unventilated infants (p < 0.01). Median daily intake was 3.2 and 2.8 g/kg for protein (n.s.), 108 and 112 kcal/kg for energy (n.s.), 175 and 160 ml/kg for volume (p < 0.01) up to day 35, respectively. Chronic lung disease occurred in 12 infants, five of whom were treated with dexamethasone. Artificial ventilation (p < 0.01) and dexamethasone treatment (p < 0.05) were independent predictors of weight gain. Median weight gain (8.2 and 9.7 g/kg/d), head growth (0.45 and 0.60 cm/week), and LLL growth (0.28 and 0.35 mm/d) were lower (p < 0.05) in ventilated than in non-ventilated infants, respectively. The correlation of LLL growth with body length (r = 0.31, p < 0.05) and head growth (r = 0.42, p < 0.01) was weak. Dexamethasone arrested growth; median LLL gain was 0.21 and 0.31 mm/d in ventilated infants with and without dexamethasone (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In VLBW infants, fetal growth rates are not reached with current feeding practice. In addition to inadequate nutrition, factors directly related to disease and treatment contribute to postnatal growth failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-650
Number of pages6
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume84
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Growth
Dexamethasone
Leg
Head
Weight Gain
Proxy
Critical Care
Fetal Development
Artificial Respiration
Lung Diseases
Gestational Age
Longitudinal Studies
Chronic Disease
Body Weight
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics
Proteins

Keywords

  • Chronic lung disease
  • CLD
  • Dexamethasone
  • Growth curves
  • Growth retardation
  • Knemometry
  • LLL
  • Lower leg length
  • Nutrition
  • Preterm infant
  • Very low birth weight infant
  • VLBW infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Loui, A., Tsalikaki, E., Maier, K., Walch, E., Kamarianakis, Y., & Obladen, M. (2008). Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks. Early Human Development, 84(10), 645-650. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.04.005

Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks. / Loui, A.; Tsalikaki, E.; Maier, K.; Walch, E.; Kamarianakis, Y.; Obladen, M.

In: Early Human Development, Vol. 84, No. 10, 10.2008, p. 645-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loui, A, Tsalikaki, E, Maier, K, Walch, E, Kamarianakis, Y & Obladen, M 2008, 'Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks', Early Human Development, vol. 84, no. 10, pp. 645-650. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.04.005
Loui, A. ; Tsalikaki, E. ; Maier, K. ; Walch, E. ; Kamarianakis, Y. ; Obladen, M. / Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks. In: Early Human Development. 2008 ; Vol. 84, No. 10. pp. 645-650.
@article{aa19c341c73044ac9ce3d44931e348c4,
title = "Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks",
abstract = "Background: Growth of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants is used to monitor nutrition and intrauterine velocity is taken as the desired goal. Aim: We hypothesised that beside nutrition growth failure is caused by disease severity. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study of 45 VLBW infants undergoing intensive care, mechanical ventilation was used as proxy to disease severity. Nutritional intake, body weight, length, head circumference, and lower leg length (LLL) were measured during the first 5 weeks of life. Results: Birthweight and gestational age were lower in 22 ventilated than in 23 unventilated infants (p < 0.01). Median daily intake was 3.2 and 2.8 g/kg for protein (n.s.), 108 and 112 kcal/kg for energy (n.s.), 175 and 160 ml/kg for volume (p < 0.01) up to day 35, respectively. Chronic lung disease occurred in 12 infants, five of whom were treated with dexamethasone. Artificial ventilation (p < 0.01) and dexamethasone treatment (p < 0.05) were independent predictors of weight gain. Median weight gain (8.2 and 9.7 g/kg/d), head growth (0.45 and 0.60 cm/week), and LLL growth (0.28 and 0.35 mm/d) were lower (p < 0.05) in ventilated than in non-ventilated infants, respectively. The correlation of LLL growth with body length (r = 0.31, p < 0.05) and head growth (r = 0.42, p < 0.01) was weak. Dexamethasone arrested growth; median LLL gain was 0.21 and 0.31 mm/d in ventilated infants with and without dexamethasone (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In VLBW infants, fetal growth rates are not reached with current feeding practice. In addition to inadequate nutrition, factors directly related to disease and treatment contribute to postnatal growth failure.",
keywords = "Chronic lung disease, CLD, Dexamethasone, Growth curves, Growth retardation, Knemometry, LLL, Lower leg length, Nutrition, Preterm infant, Very low birth weight infant, VLBW infant",
author = "A. Loui and E. Tsalikaki and K. Maier and E. Walch and Y. Kamarianakis and M. Obladen",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.04.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "645--650",
journal = "Early Human Development",
issn = "0378-3782",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Growth in high risk infants < 1500 g birthweight during the first 5 weeks

AU - Loui, A.

AU - Tsalikaki, E.

AU - Maier, K.

AU - Walch, E.

AU - Kamarianakis, Y.

AU - Obladen, M.

PY - 2008/10

Y1 - 2008/10

N2 - Background: Growth of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants is used to monitor nutrition and intrauterine velocity is taken as the desired goal. Aim: We hypothesised that beside nutrition growth failure is caused by disease severity. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study of 45 VLBW infants undergoing intensive care, mechanical ventilation was used as proxy to disease severity. Nutritional intake, body weight, length, head circumference, and lower leg length (LLL) were measured during the first 5 weeks of life. Results: Birthweight and gestational age were lower in 22 ventilated than in 23 unventilated infants (p < 0.01). Median daily intake was 3.2 and 2.8 g/kg for protein (n.s.), 108 and 112 kcal/kg for energy (n.s.), 175 and 160 ml/kg for volume (p < 0.01) up to day 35, respectively. Chronic lung disease occurred in 12 infants, five of whom were treated with dexamethasone. Artificial ventilation (p < 0.01) and dexamethasone treatment (p < 0.05) were independent predictors of weight gain. Median weight gain (8.2 and 9.7 g/kg/d), head growth (0.45 and 0.60 cm/week), and LLL growth (0.28 and 0.35 mm/d) were lower (p < 0.05) in ventilated than in non-ventilated infants, respectively. The correlation of LLL growth with body length (r = 0.31, p < 0.05) and head growth (r = 0.42, p < 0.01) was weak. Dexamethasone arrested growth; median LLL gain was 0.21 and 0.31 mm/d in ventilated infants with and without dexamethasone (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In VLBW infants, fetal growth rates are not reached with current feeding practice. In addition to inadequate nutrition, factors directly related to disease and treatment contribute to postnatal growth failure.

AB - Background: Growth of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants is used to monitor nutrition and intrauterine velocity is taken as the desired goal. Aim: We hypothesised that beside nutrition growth failure is caused by disease severity. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study of 45 VLBW infants undergoing intensive care, mechanical ventilation was used as proxy to disease severity. Nutritional intake, body weight, length, head circumference, and lower leg length (LLL) were measured during the first 5 weeks of life. Results: Birthweight and gestational age were lower in 22 ventilated than in 23 unventilated infants (p < 0.01). Median daily intake was 3.2 and 2.8 g/kg for protein (n.s.), 108 and 112 kcal/kg for energy (n.s.), 175 and 160 ml/kg for volume (p < 0.01) up to day 35, respectively. Chronic lung disease occurred in 12 infants, five of whom were treated with dexamethasone. Artificial ventilation (p < 0.01) and dexamethasone treatment (p < 0.05) were independent predictors of weight gain. Median weight gain (8.2 and 9.7 g/kg/d), head growth (0.45 and 0.60 cm/week), and LLL growth (0.28 and 0.35 mm/d) were lower (p < 0.05) in ventilated than in non-ventilated infants, respectively. The correlation of LLL growth with body length (r = 0.31, p < 0.05) and head growth (r = 0.42, p < 0.01) was weak. Dexamethasone arrested growth; median LLL gain was 0.21 and 0.31 mm/d in ventilated infants with and without dexamethasone (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In VLBW infants, fetal growth rates are not reached with current feeding practice. In addition to inadequate nutrition, factors directly related to disease and treatment contribute to postnatal growth failure.

KW - Chronic lung disease

KW - CLD

KW - Dexamethasone

KW - Growth curves

KW - Growth retardation

KW - Knemometry

KW - LLL

KW - Lower leg length

KW - Nutrition

KW - Preterm infant

KW - Very low birth weight infant

KW - VLBW infant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=53049097146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=53049097146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.04.005

DO - 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2008.04.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 18539413

AN - SCOPUS:53049097146

VL - 84

SP - 645

EP - 650

JO - Early Human Development

JF - Early Human Development

SN - 0378-3782

IS - 10

ER -