Green capital and social reproduction within families practising voluntary simplicity in the US

Carol S. Walther, Jennifer Sandlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine how parents in the US who practise voluntary simplicity enact family and social reproduction. Two key findings emerged. First, adult simplifiers in our study typically grew up within families that practised voluntary simplicity or frugality and transmit these consumption patterns to their own children. Second, simplifiers often struggle with other family members, friends and society over issues related to the tensions that emerge as they seek to simplify their lives while at the same time raising children who will not be 'shunned' by a mainstream, consumption-focused society. We conclude that parents who voluntarily simplify are able to maintain their social class status through redefining what it means to be middle class through the creation and utilization of 'green capital'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-45
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Consumer Studies
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Reproduction
Parents
Social Class
Economics
Social Capital
Social reproduction
Simplicity
Consumption patterns
Middle class
Frugality

Keywords

  • Anti-consumption
  • Family and social reproduction
  • Green capital
  • Voluntary simplifiers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Green capital and social reproduction within families practising voluntary simplicity in the US. / Walther, Carol S.; Sandlin, Jennifer.

In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 36-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{73f41b7f8d71484cbc7ace28cd889183,
title = "Green capital and social reproduction within families practising voluntary simplicity in the US",
abstract = "In this paper, we examine how parents in the US who practise voluntary simplicity enact family and social reproduction. Two key findings emerged. First, adult simplifiers in our study typically grew up within families that practised voluntary simplicity or frugality and transmit these consumption patterns to their own children. Second, simplifiers often struggle with other family members, friends and society over issues related to the tensions that emerge as they seek to simplify their lives while at the same time raising children who will not be 'shunned' by a mainstream, consumption-focused society. We conclude that parents who voluntarily simplify are able to maintain their social class status through redefining what it means to be middle class through the creation and utilization of 'green capital'.",
keywords = "Anti-consumption, Family and social reproduction, Green capital, Voluntary simplifiers",
author = "Walther, {Carol S.} and Jennifer Sandlin",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1470-6431.2011.01050.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "36--45",
journal = "International Journal of Consumer Studies",
issn = "1470-6423",
publisher = "Blackwell Science",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Green capital and social reproduction within families practising voluntary simplicity in the US

AU - Walther, Carol S.

AU - Sandlin, Jennifer

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - In this paper, we examine how parents in the US who practise voluntary simplicity enact family and social reproduction. Two key findings emerged. First, adult simplifiers in our study typically grew up within families that practised voluntary simplicity or frugality and transmit these consumption patterns to their own children. Second, simplifiers often struggle with other family members, friends and society over issues related to the tensions that emerge as they seek to simplify their lives while at the same time raising children who will not be 'shunned' by a mainstream, consumption-focused society. We conclude that parents who voluntarily simplify are able to maintain their social class status through redefining what it means to be middle class through the creation and utilization of 'green capital'.

AB - In this paper, we examine how parents in the US who practise voluntary simplicity enact family and social reproduction. Two key findings emerged. First, adult simplifiers in our study typically grew up within families that practised voluntary simplicity or frugality and transmit these consumption patterns to their own children. Second, simplifiers often struggle with other family members, friends and society over issues related to the tensions that emerge as they seek to simplify their lives while at the same time raising children who will not be 'shunned' by a mainstream, consumption-focused society. We conclude that parents who voluntarily simplify are able to maintain their social class status through redefining what it means to be middle class through the creation and utilization of 'green capital'.

KW - Anti-consumption

KW - Family and social reproduction

KW - Green capital

KW - Voluntary simplifiers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872382866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872382866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1470-6431.2011.01050.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1470-6431.2011.01050.x

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 36

EP - 45

JO - International Journal of Consumer Studies

JF - International Journal of Consumer Studies

SN - 1470-6423

IS - 1

ER -